A contract to enter into a contract is not enforceable. when contract is subject to Negotiation, it is too uncertain to have a binding force.

 If the law does not recognise a contract to enter into a contract (when there is a fundamental term yet to be agreed) it seems to me it cannot recognise a contract to negotiate. The reason is because it is too uncertain to have any binding force . . . It seems to me that a contract to negotiate, like a contract to enter into a contract, is not a contract known to the law . . . I think we must apply the general principle that where there is a fundamental matter left undecided and to be the subject of negotiation, there is no contract. per Lord Denning MR in Courtney & Fairbairn Ltd v Tolaini Brothers (Hotels) Ltd [1975] 1 WLR 297; [1975] 1 All ER 716.

Explain and discuss with reference to relevant case-law.