Eorge Orwells Articles Is Good for College Students

Literary Analysis Argument: College Students and George Orwell

Some scholars believe that George Orwells essays should be required reading for English 101 students. Others disagree, and suggest that his work should never appear in a college classroom. What do you think? Write an essay in third person, using research to support your ideas, that makes your argument in a logical and convincing manner. Remember to include a list of works cited at the end of your essay, in the same document (if you dont you will be comitting plagiarism and fail this assignment!) You can use the thesis template below to get started.

George Orwells essays, especially ______(title)_______, should/should never be required reading for English 101 students because _________,

_________, and_________.

The Essay: In this essay, you will argue that a particular text by George Orwell (preferably one of his essays, like A Hanging, Shooting an Elephant, or Politics and the English Language) should be assigned reading in college. In order to successfully make this argument, you must have a compelling thesis idea about why the text should be assigned, as well as three strong reasons that support your idea.

The Process: Solid preparation is essential to success in writing this essay. You are encouraged to conduct research, draft thesis statements, write and outline and engage in any other pre-writing activities that you have found helpful this quarter. As you work on this essay, use the checklist below to make sure you have everything you need:

Sources: your textbook, printed articles and essays, and research notes
A works cited list: to be turned in with your essay
A formal sentence outline: which may include a thesis statement, topic sentences, and underneath the topic sentences no more than three sentences (A,B, and C) that contain the support you will use in that paragraph

Requirements:
Your Name
English 101
Final Essay

Title: Your title should be centered and the first letter of every word should be capitalized, excepting prepositions and articles. Your title needs to let the reader know what your essay is about in a clear and interesting way, using as few words as possible.

Introduction:
Opening Sentence: The introduction needs to begin in a way that will catch the readeri??s attention and entice her to keep reading.
Often an introduction gives some background information about the subject in order to prepare the reader to understand the rest of the essay. At least a few sentences of background information form a transition between the opening sentence and the thesis statement.
Thesis statement: The final sentence should consist of a thesis statement that presents an original idea that unites the topic of each paragraph, as well as an indication of the order in which you intend to present those topics, or the steps by which you will develop this idea. Remember, i??All college students should read X essay by X authori?? is not a sufficiently original idea. In addition to the original thesis idea, the reasons supporting that idea (which will appear again in topic sentences, in a more sophisticated form) should also be contained in the thesis statement.

Body Paragraphs: Your essay should have at least three of these, and as many more as you need to fully develop your thesis idea. (Note: this is why its important to narrow your thesis as much as possible–if your thesis statement is broad it will take dozens of paragraphs to develop your idea!)
Topic Sentence: Topic sentences are like mini-thesis statements in that each one presents the original idea that unites the information in that paragraph.
Support: Each paragraph should contain examples, details, and analysis that directly support the topic sentence. Quoting, summarizing, and paraphrasing the text you have chosen or the outside sources are excellent ways of supporting your ideas.
Concluding Sentence: The last sentence of each paragraph should provide closure, so that youi??re not leaving your reader with unanswered questions or doubts, or jumping to the next paragraph without a transition.

Conclusion: This is where you drive your point home. Your conclusion needs to be more than a simple restatement of your thesis, but it shouldni??t introduce new ideas or arguments either. Sometimes one last example will clinch the idea presented in your thesis statement

Works Cited: This is where you will list the credible sources that you used to support the ideas in your essay. Use as many as you need to support your ideas. These sources should be listed in standard MLA format.