Harles law acids, bases and gas properties

Urgent please
note: Number of sources not required
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CHARLESa LAW

Introduction

Procedure

< Include information that the reader would need to repeat your experimental procedure. Do not include any observations or results in this section>

Observations and Results

Trial Temperature (A°Celcius) Absolute Temperature
(A°Kelvin) Volume (mL)
Experiment Volume (mL)
Calculated
A
B
C
D
E

Discussion

Conclusion

< Within a few sentences, provide a concluding statement about the results of your laboratory> ………..

ChemLab experiment: Charles Law.

The mathematical relationship between the temperature and volume of a gas was described by Jacques Charles in 1787. This law states that the volume of a fixed amount of a gas at a constant pressure is directly proportional to its absolute temperature. This equation is written as V bT, where V is volume, T is temperature, and b is a proportionality constant.

Experimentally, when the same sample of trapped gas is at a constant pressure, the initial volume (V1) divided by the initial absolute temperature (V2) is equal to the final volume (V2) divided by the final absolute temperature (T2). Thus, V1/T1V2/T2.

Given this information, you will identify that the moles of H2 evolved moles of Mg consumed.

Procedure: You will conduct five different trials. Temperature conditions will change for each trial. You will use the same setup of the equipment through all five trials.

Initial Setup:

* From the Equipment menu, select Gas Syringe Sealed (do not select Gas Syringe with Gauge).
* Set Syringe volume to 20ML in the dialog box. Click OK. Note the barometric reading (air pressure).
* Right-click on Gas Syringe, and select Thermometer.

Trial A:

* Record the volume and temperature in the Observations section of your Lab Report Template.
o Note: These values are your V1 and T1, respectively. *( 20volume/20 degree celsius ))

Trial B:

* From the Equipment menu, select a 250 ml beaker.
* Right-click on the beaker, and select Distilled Water. Add 200 ml of ice water (-20A° Celsius). Click OK.
* Right-click on the beaker, and add Thermometer.
* Select the syringe and place it in the beaker. Select the syringe and beaker. Right-click on it, and select Combine (do not select Group).
* Allow for the temperature in the syringe to reach the same temperature as the ice water bath (-20A° Celsius). This may take three minutes or more.
* Record the volume and temperature in the Observations section of your Lab Report Template.
o Note: To read the volume of the gas in the syringe, look very closely at the bottom of the syringeas orange plunger.

( 10.7 Volume/20 degree celsius)

Trial C:

* Remove the syringe from the water bath by right-clicking on it and selecting Remove.
* Empty the beaker by right-clicking on it and selecting Empty.
* Right-click on Beaker, and add Thermometer.
* Right-click on the beaker, and select Distilled Water. Add 100 ml of ice water (-20A° Celsius).
* Right-click on the beaker, and select Distilled Water. Add 100 ml of room temperature water (20A° Celsius) by selecting final volume level of 200 ml. Click OK.
* Record the temperature.

((( O degrees celsius )))

* Select the syringe, and place it in the beaker. Select the syringe and beaker. Right-click on it, and select Combine (do not select Group).
* Allow for the temperature in the syringe to reach the same temperature as the water in the beaker. This may take three minutes or more.
* Record the volume and temperature in the Observations section of your Lab Report Template.

( 10.9 volume/0 degrees celsuis )

Trial D:

* Remove the syringe from the water bath by right-clicking and selecting Remove.
* Empty the beaker by right-clicking on it and selecting Empty.
* Right-click on Beaker, and add Thermometer.
* Right click on Beaker, and select Distilled Water. Add 100 ml of room temperature water (20A° Celsius).
* From the Equipment menu, select Bunsen Burner. Place the Bunsen burner beneath the beaker of water.
* Heat until the water reaches 100A° Celsius.
* Right-click on beaker, and select Distilled Water. Add 100 ml of room temperature water (20A° Celsius) by selecting final volume level of 200 ml. Click OK.
* Remove the Bunsen burner.
* Select the syringe, and place it in the beaker. Select the syringe and beaker. Right-click and select Combine (do not select Group).
* Allow for the temperature in the syringe to reach the same temperature as the water in the beaker. This may take three minutes or more.
* Record the volume and temperature in the Observations section of your Lab Report Template.

*** (20.3 volume/58degree celsius) ***

Trial E:

* Remove the syringe from the water bath by right-clicking and selecting Remove.
* Empty the beaker by right-clicking on it and selecting Empty.
* Right-click on Beaker, and add Thermometer.
* Right click on the beaker, and select Distilled Water. Add 200 ml of room temperature water (20A° Celsius).
* From the Equipment menu, select Bunsen Burner. Place the Bunsen burner beneath the beaker of water.
* Heat until the water reaches 100A° Celsius.
* Remove the Bunsen burner.
* Select the syringe and place it in the beaker. Select the syringe and beaker. Right-click on it, and select Combine (do not select Group).
* Allow for the temperature in the syringe to reach the same temperature as the water in the beaker. This may take three minutes or more.
* Record the volume and temperature in the Observations section of your Lab Report Template.

***** (20.5 volume/90 degree celsius) ***

STEP 3: Write Lab Report
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Follow the directions above to write your lab report. Use the Lab Report Template that is provided above.

* In the Observations and Results section, calculate and record the expected volume (V2) for measured temperature in Trials B, C, D, and E, based upon Charles law.
* Include the following information in the Discussion section:
o Using Charles law, calculate the predicted volume of gas for each of the temperature points in your experiment.
o The values from Trial A are your V1 and T1.
o The temperature measured in Trials B, C, D, and E is the T2 for that experiment.
o You will need to convert A°Celsius to A°Kelvin (Refer to Chapter 1.).
o Discuss how your calculated values compare to your experimental values.
o Discuss how volume changes when temperature changes.
o In an actual laboratory, what types of safety precautions are needed?