Hemistry : Melting Points of Selected Organic Compounds

I will attach the instruction of the required lab
( melting point)

The lab report should meet with these outlines:

Lab Reports

A Lab Report is REQUIRED for each experiment.

A Lab Report grading rubric will be provided.

Lab Report Format:

All lab reports must be typewritten and saved in Rich Text Format.

Each Lab Report should begin with the following information in the upper left hand corner:

Title
Exp. No.
Name
Date

Followed by…

I. Purpose
II. Experimental Method
III. Raw Data and Calculations
IV. Results
V. Conclusion
Use Roman Numerals and Section Headings, as listed above, in ALL of your reports. Here is more information about each section.

I. Purpose

A statement of objectives or a hypothesis may be necessary in this section. The hypothesis is what you think will happen during the investigation. It differs from a guess in that it is based upon prior knowledge or evidence. If an hypothesis is stated it should be supported by previously developed evidence and/or concepts.

II. Experimental Method

Describe materials/equipment used. Write a summary of the procedure. DO NOT copy the procedure given in your experiment handout or write a step-by-step list of the method. Instead, summarize the procedure. Explain what you did in order to collect the DATA. You should understand and be able to apply the principles involved in running the experiment. And you are encouraged to identify the assumptions upon which the experiment is based.

III. Raw Data and Calculations

Evidence collected during the experiment; numbers read directly from laboratory instruments (clocks, rulers, balances, etc., but not calculators). Data should be well organized and tabulated when possible. Use care in scale reading and use significant figures when taking measurements. Develop a sense of how much data is desirable. Do not hide or eliminate suspected faulty data but present it. Later, in your CONCLUSIONS, you may explain why you have decided not to use suspected errors in your analysis.

Other forms of evidence, qualitative in nature, may also be recorded in this section; for example, something unexpected that happened during the experiment that may affect your CONCLUSIONS. Observations such as color changes, precipitate formation, gas evolution should also be recorded.

Show all calculations. You are encouraged to use calculators and computers. Spreadsheet graphs used in the analysis should appear in this section. Use significant figures in calculations involving measurements. Use units as well as numbers in all calculations. Use dimensional analysis to accomplish this.

IV. Results

The final form in which the evidence is prepared. You perform CALCULATIONS on the DATA in order to develop RESULTS. Your CONCLUSIONS should be understandable by looking at your RESULTS. Tables, and graphs are appropriate in this section. Do Not show calculations in this section.

V. Conclusion

This section contains the answers to the problem stated in the TITLE and INTRODUCTION. Base your conclusions on your RESULTS, not despite them. Look for more than one conclusion to the problem, with suggestions for further work in order to differentiate these at a later date. It is not necessary to do the further work. Understand that conclusions from one experiment usually form the hypotheses to new experiments. Explain experimental errors that appear in the results. Show an awareness of the limitations of the results when making generalizations.