Hemistry of Hazardous Materials Case Study

This is a resubmit. I submitted this job before but the paper was not in several revisions what I needed.

CASE STUDIES ARE DESIGNED TO PUT YOU IN EVERYDAY SITUATIONS SO THAT YOU CAN HONE YOUR INCIDENT EVALUATION SKILLS AND CRITICALLY THINK THROUGH THE SEQUENCE OF ACTIONS THAT YOU WOULD FOLLOW TO PROTECT LIVES AND THE ENVIRONMENT. RESPONSES ARE DEVELOPED TO THE CASE STUDIES; PLEASE REMEMBER TO THINK SEQUENCE, ACTION PLAN, AND COMMUNICATION IN YOUR SOLUTION TO THE INCIDENTS. TAKE THE INFORMATION YOU GATHER FROM THE TEXT, OTHER SUPPORT MATERIAL (ERG, ETC.) AND THINK ABOUT THEM. THEN FORMULATE WHAT YOU AND/OR YOUR TEAM WOULD DO.

Read the scenario below and respond in the form of an essay, which should consist of several
paragraphs and appropriate priority or task lists. Responses should be supported fully and completely. A well-thought-out response double spaced. Any published material used to
support a response should be cited per the APA style guidelines with in text citations. The only required source material are the chapters of my book which have a link below. Please remember to think sequence, action plan, & communication in the solution. This is you stating in that order what you and your team need to do. Chap 1, Chap 8, & Chap 9.

Case Study
The Scenario:
You are an EH&S professional returning home from your plant on a summer Friday afternoon at about 4 p.m. You have just picked up some materials from a nearby building supply store for a weekend backyard project (cement, sand, wood, concrete blocks, lumber, etc.). You are about one mile outside of the main population zone of your small town, and you come upon an accident scene in which a placarded tanker truck is turned on its side in a ditch about 20-25 feet off the two-lane road. There is no sign of fire and no sign of the driver from your vantage point inside your truck. The only sign you can see from your vantage point is a Dangerous When Wet placard with a Class 8 label code and a UN 1836 on an orange panel. What might this chemical be? You think you can make out an NFPA diamond with a 0 at 12 oclock; a 2 at 3 oclock; a 4 at 9 oclock; and a slashed W at 6 oclock. You take out the small binoculars from your truck and scan the scene. There seems to be a thin, small volume of dripping liquid (red to yellow color) coming from a valve on the tanker.

Links to source material are below and chapter 1 will be attached.