Iscussion: Design Thinking Inspiration and Ideation Part II

Discussion: Design-Thinking Inspiration and Ideation

Read a selection of your colleaguesa postings.

Respond by Day 5, to your colleagues by doing the following:

First, respond to the Discussion posts of two colleagues. If possible, respond to colleagues who have not yet received feedback on their original post. (COLLEAGUE POSTS ATTACHED PLEASE SELECT ONE FOR EACH OF THE TWO INSTRUCTIONS BELOW AND ANSWER ACCORDING TO THE DIRECTIONS AS IF FROM ME DIRECTLY TO MY COLLEAGUE 125+ WORDS PER RESPONSE AND AT LEAST TWO CITATIONS PLEASE READ DIRECTIONS CAREFULLY BELOW THERE ARE TWO DIFFERENT WAYS TO RESPOND )

Consider the problem they have described, and brainstorm at least 5 additional ideas that might solve their problems. Post your ideas as a response to your colleagues to help them consider new aspects of their problem.

Second, respond to the post of one of your colleagues (you may choose one of the colleagues for whom you offered new ideas, or select another colleagues post. If possible, respond to a colleague who may not yet have received feedback):

Select one of the ideas you find most interesting as a possible solution and make a case for why this idea could be a potential solution to the problem identified by your colleague.

Additionally, as part of your response, share your observations about the design thinking process. Explain aspects of it that were helpful in generating ideas and evaluating solutions.

References:

Magadley, W., & Birdi, K. (2012, February). Two sides of the innovation coin? An empirical investigation of the relative correlates of idea generation and idea implementation. International Journal of Innovation Management, 16(1), 1a 28.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

This article investigates the innovative process by analyzing idea generating and idea implementation separately and looking closely at the influence of individual level factors and group and organizational factors.

Brown, T. (2008, June). Design thinking. Harvard Business Review, 86(6), 84a 92. Retrieved from 79d67270626d8aca2cb2e933457d14e3

When you think of design in the business context, do you think of the appealing packaging of a product like the iPhone or an iconic logo like the one on the Coca-Cola bottle? Design thinking, in the business context, refers not only to these aesthetic dimensions, but to a creative-thinking process that carefully considers user needs, financial possibilities, and many other factors. The design-thinking method is a new way to bring creativity to each step of the product or service development model. As you read this article, consider how creativity, when brought to every step of business processes, can lead to innovation.

Brown, B., & Scott, A. D. (2011, June). How P&G tripled its innovation success rate. Harvard Business Review, 89(6), 64a 72. Retrieved from 75470c4919e05c6c08c6ea7694c13420

Proctor and Gamble has always been a leader in its industry; for a time, however, its efforts at innovation were met with only modest commercial success. This article explores how P&G created and instituted a revolutionary method to systematize the processes that lead to innovation.