Ive a critical account/exposition of two of the texts foregrounding one shared dominant thematic or feature that is shared by your chosen texts.

aims

This aims to develop students awareness of Post-Millennial British Fiction 2001  Present by examining the work of both established and lesser-known (including often more experimental) writers, in the context of the events of 9/11, the War on Terror, and the subsequent theme of disruption, potentially the end of multicultural optimisms (conviviality), the traumatological and a notion of the traumatized subject, and the credit crunch which may preface a huge economic downturn. Generally this is regarded as a period characterized by the aftermath of such iconographic events that marked a shifting world order, and certain economic challenges to late capitalism and the global economy. Both in terms of the above contexts and the ongoing aesthetic practice of the novel as a genre, the module will deal with the period as a whole conceptually, looking at a variety of writing, at a range of relevant themes, and will focus on developing knowledge of the variety and complexity of contemporary writing, its aesthetic characteristics, and its social and cultural contexts. The teaching programme will involve students in developing specialised knowledge of at least four contemporary writers and considering representative themes relevant to the chosen work.

In considering the period after 9/11, the module examines the work of both established and less established writers of the Anglophone novel published in Britain, including those from a range of backgrounds and those continuing the more experimental zeitgeist that was a feature of the novel in the period from the late 1960s. Naturally these years from 1969  2001 are often regarded as framed by headline events such as 9/11, the Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the publication of Zadie Smith s high-profile novel, White Teeth (2001), the execution of Saddam Hussein, 7/7, but this module concedes, recognizes and considers the possibility that literature can reveal subtler or more neglected truths and histories. In fictional narratives more personal narratives may vie with those circulating in the public domain.

Engaging both with literary critical responses and relevant theoretical material, the module will deal with the period as a whole through a variety of conceptual positions and discourses, looking at a variety of writing, a range of authors, and it will be focused on developing knowledge of the variety and complexity of contemporary writing and its social and cultural context. The teaching programme will involve students in developing specialised knowledge of the work of at least four contemporary writers and/or representative themes. Clearly an ability to adapt so as to read analyze and synthesize your interpretation of a combination of genres may be required at times. Whatever the range of perspectives considered, the module will develop knowledge of the variety and complexity of contemporary writing and its social and cultural context. Importantly, students should recognize that in studying such a recent period, they may need to be resourceful in finding literary criticism or theoretical material relevant to such recent texts, some of which may not have been responded to in any concentrated fashion by academics, if at all. OUTCOMES
outcomes that must BE achieve
:

(A) Knowledge and Understanding

Outline the variety of Post-Millennial British Fiction 2001  Present and its typical themes.
Relate the relationship between Post-Millennial British Fiction and its context(s): aesthetic, cultural, intellectual, social

(B) Cognitive (thinking) Skills

Analyse the thematic interests and formal techniques used by at least four contemporary writers, and situate these in context of other work studied in the module.
Explain and examine in detail the work of at least four contemporary writers covering various literary genres or decades.
Close reading, analysis and conceptual synthesis.
Relate the fiction studied to larger aesthetic and historical contexts.

Variety of material retrieval skills incorporating a number of media in a number of formats
Finding and responding to appropriate literary criticism or theoretical material relevant to the texts studied
Critical and conceptual engagement with texts and application of theoretical materials.
Standard harvard
italics of books, tv programmes and films