Loat Nurses Protocal in Medical Offices/ Float Nurse Team Collaboration

(see below for article in periodicle)
Nursing Forum Volume 43 No, 3, July-September 2008 (journal)

#1
Nursing Mana
gement: Oct 2000, Vol 31 Issue 10, pg6-6, 1/6p #2 (sink or float)?
Nursing : Jul 95, Vol 25 Issue 7, p70-70, 3/4p,
#3 (Keeping your feet on the ground)
More Articles:
How to keep float nurses from sinking.
Kidner MC.
Public Health Office, Worland, Wyo., USA.
Floating. Its a word that makes nurses cringe. If youre a charge nurse with staffing responsibilities in acute care, you can use the strategies discussed here to help ensure that float nurses have a positive experience working on your unit–and a positive impact on patient care.
PMID: 10542638 [PubMed indexed for MEDLINE]
Mentoring–a staff retention tool.
Kanaskie ML.
Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA 17033, USA. mkanaskiepsu.edu
Staff retention presents a common challenge for hospitals nationwide. Mentorship programs have been explored as one method of creating environments that promote staff retention. Successful achievement of nurse competencies identified in the Synergy Model for Patient Care can best be achieved in an environment that encourages and facilitates mentoring. Mentoring relationships in critical care provide the ongoing interactions, coaching, teaching, and role modeling to facilitate nurses progression along this continuum. Mentoring relationships offer support and professional development for nurses at all levels within an organization as well as an optimistic outlook for the nursing profession.
PMID: 16862027 [PubMed indexed for MEDLINE]

NURSING EDUCATION TODAY 2009 29 168-175 (The emotional labour of nursing)
Nurse Management October 2000
MedSurg Nursing June 2004 Vol 13/No 3

Mentoring–a staff retention tool.
Kanaskie ML.
Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA 17033, USA. mkanaskiepsu.edu
Staff retention presents a common challenge for hospitals nationwide. Mentorship programs have been explored as one method of creating environments that promote staff retention. Successful achievement of nurse competencies identified in the Synergy Model for Patient Care can best be achieved in an environment that encourages and facilitates mentoring. Mentoring relationships in critical care provide the ongoing interactions, coaching, teaching, and role modeling to facilitate nurses progression along this continuum. Mentoring relationships offer support and professional development for nurses at all levels within an organization as well as an optimistic outlook for the nursing profession.
PMID: 16862027 [PubMed indexed for MEDLINE]

Abstract
Newly graduated nurses often finish orientation and then believe they still need more support and mentoring than is available. Retention rates suffer as they think it must be better elsewhere. This article reports a community hospitals implementation of an education-based preceptor program. A convenience sample of 40 new graduates participated in the study. Qualitative and quantitative findings indicate a high level of satisfaction (mean visual analogue scale score 93.7), 29% increase in retention, and 9.5% decrease in vacancy.

Journal for Nurses in Staff Development (JNSD):Volume 20(6)November/December 2004pp 268-273

Short-Term Nurse Scheduling in Response to Daily Fluctuations in Supply and Demand
Journal Health Care Management Science
Publisher Springer Netherlands
ISSN 1386-9620 (Print) 1572-9389 (Online)
Issue Volume 8, Number 4 / November, 2005
DOI 10.1007/s10729-005-4141-9
Pages 315-324
Subject Collection Business and Economics
SpringerLink Date Saturday, December 17, 2005

Abstract Hourly changes in patient census and acuity require hospitals to update their staffing needs on a continuing basis. This paper discusses the problem that management faces several times a day as the demand for nursing services departs from the planned schedule. Prior to the start of each shift, the number of nurses who are scheduled to be on duty over the next 24 hours is compared with the number actually available, and if shortages exist a series of decisions have to be made to ensure that each unit in the hospital has sufficient coverage. These decisions involve the use of overtime, outside nurses, and floaters. To address this problem, we have developed an integer programming model that takes the current set of rosters for regular and pool nurses and the expected demand for the upcoming 24 hours as input, and produces a revised schedule that makes the most efficient use of the available resources. The model is formulated and solved at a hospital-wide level rather than for each unit separately. To determine its applicability, a representative set of scenarios was investigated using data obtained from a medium-size facility in the U.S. with 14 units. The results indicate that problem instances with up to 120 nurses can be solved in a negligible amount of time.
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Title: How to keep float nurses from sinking. By: Kidner MC, RN, 00337021, September 1, 1999, Vol. 62, Issue 9
Database: CINAHL Plus with Full TextHTML Full TextHOW TO KEEP FLOAT NURSES FROM SINKING
Contents
Recognize emotions that are at play
Make assignments with care
Consider using a team approach
Continue to take a hands-on role
KEY WORDS
REFERENCES
Floating. Its a word that makes nurses cringe. If youre a charge nurse with staffing responsibilities in acute care, you can use the strategies discussed here top help ensure that float nurses have a positive experience working on you unit–and a positive impact on patient care.

When a unit is short-staffed, the charge nurse may have no choice but to request that a nurse from another unit be reassigned to help carry the patient load. Too often, though, the shift turns out to be an exercise in endurance and emotional stress for all concerned, but especially for the floater.

I know, Ive been through it: Several years ago, I was floated to a unit that was so unfamiliar to me I had to ask for directions just to find it. Once there, I was given six patients–without an orientation–and, following report, was expected to function completely on my own. To make matters worse, I was a night-shift nurse floating to a day shift, so I had no idea when meals were distributed, when physicians rounded–or, for that matter, who the physicians were–or where anything was on the floor. Fortunately, a pool RN was kind enough to show me where the thermometer was and how to get into the narcotics box.

I was an experienced nurse, but I felt displaced and incompetent. The saddest part of this story is that four of the six patients I cared for said I was the best nurse they had had during their stay and asked if I would be back! Needless to say, I never wanted to set foot on that floor again.

Another memorable floating adventure was a shift I spent on a busy med/surg unit nicknamed The war zone.When I walked into the report room, the charge nurse said, Oh, good, our float is here. Each of you choose a patient and give him to Maria.Guess what? I had six total-care patients with long-term complications-and they each had five!

Float nurses have traditionally been treated poorly and with little consideration. However, if you are a charge nurse, you have the power to change all that. By using several simple tactics, you can make floating a positive experience for all concerned.

Recognize emotions that are at play
In most cases, floating is difficult for both the floater and the units regular staff. The floater may feel intimidated because

she has no control over the situation, insecure because she is unsure of the technical aspects particular to the new floor, lonely because she feels she has no support, and unwelcome–whether this feeling is based on a misperception or reality.

The nurses on the receiving floor, meanwhile, are often unsure of, and apprehensive about, the float nurses skills. They may also be upset if she