Lose critical analysis of a short story The Bloody Chamber Angela Carter A level

Course: Access to HE Diploma (Humanities and Social Science)

Unit Title: English: The Short Story The Bloody Chamber Angela Carter

Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this unit, the learner will know/be able to:
Assessment criteria:
The learning outcomes will have been achieved when the learner has:
1. show, through practice or analysis, the characteristics of the short story genre
1.1 identified or exemplified key features of the short story genre.

1.2 recognised the function of the short story genre.
2. apply critical or creative writing concepts.

2.1 applied literary and linguistic techniques in writing and/ or analysis of a short story.

2.2 illuminated relevant aspects of a chosen short story or creative piece of work.
3. develop skills in critical or creative writing with evidence of secondary research.

3.1 developed the writing process in a comprehensibly written piece of work.

3.2 provide academically structured and academically referenced work.

Guidance Notes for Writing a Critical Analysis of a Short Story

The Short Story module uses the following learning outcomes:

By the end of the module the student will be able to:

1. show, through practice or analysis, the characteristics of the short story genre

2 apply critical or creative writing concepts

3 develop skills in critical or creative writing with evidence of secondary research.

These will be achieved when the student has:

1.1 identified or exemplified key features of the short story genre

1.2 Recognised the function of the short story.

2.1 applied literary and linguistic techniques in writing and/or analysis of a short story

2.2 illuminated relevant aspects of a chosen short story or a creative piece of work

3.1 developed the writing process in a comprehensibly written piece of work.

3.2 provided academically structured and academically referenced work.

You therefore need to produce an analysis of a short story that you have selected, either from the texts that we have studied in class, or from the other texts provided on Blackboard or from your own reading.

You need to analyse how the story works as a short story. So how far does it follow the conventions that we have identified as characteristic of the short story? Does it start in media res? Does it use Poes theory of unity of impression? Does it follow Modernist techniques of stream of consciousness or dislocation of linear narrative? Does it use postmodernist techniques of magic realism, the switch from fantasy to reality, or defamiliarisation? Does it use mimetic or diagetic narrative? Is there any use of focalisation or free indirect speech? Does it conform to Raymond Carvers idea that in a short story you should get in, get out?

You need to analyse the short story that you have chosen, using the techniques of close critical analysis that we developed in unit one in relation to The Lonely Londoners, but you need to relate this analysis to the conventions of the short story.

To develop your analysis, you need to refer to appropriate secondary material. You can use some of the material that we have looked at in class, but you also need to find (and read) appropriate sources from the library, both on your chosen author and on the short story form itself. The reading list provides a starting point, but you need to extend this with your own researches into your own particular chosen story and find suitable academic resources.

The aim of using secondary sources is to show the range of different interpretations both of your chosen author and of the short story form as a whole. You are outlining how you are reading the text, but you also need to show how this reading relates to the ideas and interpretations of other people. So you are not just looking for secondary sources that agree with you to back your argument up. Rather, you are looking for sources that disagree with one another, to show all the different ways in which your story can be interpreted.

When you cite a primary or secondary source, you need to include a reference presented in line with Harvard conventions i?? i.e. (May, 2002, p. 67). At the end of the essay you MUST provide a bibliography (or list of references) showing all the primary and secondary sources that you used to write the essay, again in line with Harvard conventions, so:

Bayley, J. (1988) The Short Story. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester

May, C (2002) The Short Story. London: Routledge

Shaw, V. (1983) The Short Story: A Critical Introduction. London: Longman