Mployer Perceptions of Business Graduates From Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Employer Perceptions of Business Graduates From Historically Black Colleges and Universities


The problem addressed in this study is the reluctance of employers to hire business graduates from HBCUs. The context behind this study pertains to a perceived lack of employment opportunities from business graduates of HBCU. The study should help employers to recognize inappropriate perceptions held of graduates from HBCUs, as well as to understand how the identified perceptions adversely affect recruitment and hiring practices. The rate of joblessness among African Americans is increasing (Holzer, Offner, & Sorensen, 2005). The United States job market has a long-term reputation of bias against African American workers (Chima, 1999; Stroman & Seltzer, 1991). According to Bertrand (2003), the resumes of job applicants with typically European American names are 50% more likely than those displaying African American names to progress to an interview. In November 2000, a massive American beverage maker and distributor settled a charge of hiring discrimination against African Americans for a record $192.5 million (King & Spruell, 2001). Discriminatory hiring practices were once widespread and legally sanctioned.

The problem allows for a significant contribution to the existing body of knowledge on HBCUs. The study could also enable corporations to review social responsibility and diversity policies to render a parallel condition between these two factors, possibly increasing levels of recruitment at HBCUs. Using Q methodology, I would study to measure the subjectivity of employer perceptions. Potential solutions include employer s diversity goals should be realized by recruiting and hiring qualified HBCU technology graduates. Upon employment, employers should assign mentors to HBCU technology graduates. HBCUs should task their career placement centers to develop measurable strategies and goals to attract more employers to recruit technology graduates.