Nalysis and Interpretation to Develop a Narrowly Focused Theme in A Passage to India

English 1B: Paper 3 Instructions and Requirements
Analysis and Interpretation to Develop a Narrowly Focused Theme in A Passage to India
If you have been taking notes all along, you should have many ideas to choose from, but if not, you
will need to go back through the novel and look for details that seem to related to something central
to the novelas overall meaning. In character-based novels like A Passage to India, a good writing topic
is often one or more of the characters. If you want to write on one of the main characters, you will
need to limit your focus to some important aspect of him or her. If you write one or more of the
minor characters, remember to analyze them in terms of what effect they have on your interpretation
and what significance these points have in relation to the novel as a whole. The ideas in your paper
should be related in some way to an important theme (idea) that is implied by the novel. Besides
characters, other good possibilities include the significance of setting (place), the symbolism of natural
objects or forces, the dynamics of clashing cultures, values, politics, philosophy, or religion. (See the
list of suggested topics posted on the course web site.)
In writing this paper, use the following steps as a guide:
1. Review what you learned when the novel was discussed in class and what you read about it in Dr.
Jabbaras book. Refer to any notes you took on these ideas and your responses to them.
2. Read over parts of the novel that you have marked as interesting or important to you.
3. Gather details that seem significant to you and record them in your notebook.
4. Notice details that seem to suggest a pattern of repeated ideas or feelings. Pay close attention to
the odd, unusual, puzzling, or disturbing aspects of the novel, especially any surprising uses of
language. Follow the guidelines for interpretation in Chapter Five of Dr. Jabbaras book.
5. All details in the text should serve some purpose and contribute to the overall effect. Try to
account for the presence of anything related to your focus, especially if it seems strange. If
something doesnat seem to belong, that could be a strong clue that it is important. Remember,
your goal is to infer one of the novelas key themes or a cluster of closely related themes.
6. Begin writing based on your notes. One approach is to freewrite your feelings and thoughts,
referring to specific passages. Comment on anything that seems important to you, being
especially aware of figurative languages, such as similes and metaphors. Consult the instructional
sheet called a?Paraphrasing Figurative Language When You Write about Works of Literature.a?
7. Brainstorm, make a plan, and try to produce a first draft. In organizing your paper, use your first
paragraph to introduce your focus and thesis with a general statement, and then explain the
central idea that you will develop in your paper. This is your interpretation of a significant theme,
and it is also your thesis. See Dr. Jabbaras directions in Chapter Seven: Formal Interpretation.
8. CRITICAL THINKING: Treat the novel as an argument, for in sense all works of literature are tacit
or implied arguments. The theme would be its claim or major proposition, and the ideas and
details should provide support for the proposition, which can be considered the reasons and
evidence presented by the author. Develop your paper by making these aspects clear, explaining
the significance of each as you proceed. In your conclusion, you should not only sum up your
main points, but also relate your ideas to the universal human condition, including any specific
references to our world today or your own experiences. But keep this part brief and concise.
9. Build on your first draft by providing clear explanation and support of your points. Delete
anything that canat be supported by something specific in the novel. If you have guessed at some
meaning or just imagined what the novel might mean but canat find any evidence for your idea in
the work itself, delete those comments from your paper. You must be able to support your
statements, and you must explain that support clearly and convincingly.
10. REVISION. To arrive at your final draft, revise and edit carefully. Follow the guidelines in Dr.
Jabbaras book, Chapter Eight: Revising. Also helpful is section 3 in Rules for Writers, which refers
you to many other sections of that explain what you can do to improve your academic writing.

**Before starting Paper 3, be sure to do the following:
a? Finish reading the novel; take some notes on some significant passages.
a? Go to The Novel page of this web site and explore the sources there.
a? Read the following pages in Dr. Jabbars book:

198-200

402-403

407-408

409-410

433 (some questions for thought)

Nalysis and Interpretation to Develop a Narrowly Focused Theme in A Passage to India

If you have been taking notes all along, you should have many ideas to choose from, but if not, you
will need to go back through the novel and look for details that seem to related to something central
to the novelas overall meaning. In character-based novels like A Passage to India, a good writing topic
is often one or more of the characters. If you want to write on one of the main characters, you will
need to limit your focus to some important aspect of him or her. If you write one or more of the
minor characters, remember to analyze them in terms of what effect they have on your interpretation
and what significance these points have in relation to the novel as a whole. The ideas in your paper
should be related in some way to an important theme (idea) that is implied by the novel. Besides
characters, other good possibilities include the significance of setting (place), the symbolism of natural
objects or forces, the dynamics of clashing cultures, values, politics, philosophy, or religion. (See the
list of suggested topics posted on the course web site.)

In writing this paper, use the following steps as a guide:

1. Review what you learned when the novel was discussed in class and what you read about it in Dr.
Jabbaras book. Refer to any notes you took on these ideas and your responses to them.

2. Read over parts of the novel that you have marked as interesting or important to you.

3. Gather details that seem significant to you and record them in your notebook.

4. Notice details that seem to suggest a pattern of repeated ideas or feelings. Pay close attention to
the odd, unusual, puzzling, or disturbing aspects of the novel, especially any surprising uses of
language. Follow the guidelines for interpretation in Chapter Five of Dr. Jabbaras book.

5. All details in the text should serve some purpose and contribute to the overall effect. Try to
account for the presence of anything related to your focus, especially if it seems strange. If
something doesnat seem to belong, that could be a strong clue that it is important. Remember,
your goal is to infer one of the novelas key themes or a cluster of closely related themes.

6. Begin writing based on your notes. One approach is to freewrite your feelings and thoughts,
referring to specific passages. Comment on anything that seems important to you, being
especially aware of figurative languages, such as similes and metaphors. Consult the instructional
sheet called a?Paraphrasing Figurative Language When You Write about Works of Literature.a?

7. Brainstorm, make a plan, and try to produce a first draft. In organizing your paper, use your first
paragraph to introduce your focus and thesis with a general statement, and then explain the
central idea that you will develop in your paper. This is your interpretation of a significant theme,
and it is also your thesis. See Dr. Jabbaras directions in Chapter Seven: Formal Interpretation.

8. CRITICAL THINKING: Treat the novel as an argument, for in sense all works of literature are tacit
or implied arguments. The theme would be its claim or major proposition, and the ideas and
details should provide support for the proposition, which can be considered the reasons and
evidence presented by the author. Develop your paper by making these aspects clear, explaining
the significance of each as you proceed. In your conclusion, you should not only sum up your
main points, but also relate your ideas to the universal human condition, including any specific
references to our world today or your own experiences. But keep this part brief and concise.

9. Build on your first draft by providing clear explanation and support of your points. Delete
anything that canat be supported by something specific in the novel. If you have guessed at some
meaning or just imagined what the novel might mean but canat find any evidence for your idea in
the work itself, delete those comments from your paper. You must be able to support your
statements, and you must explain that support clearly and convincingly.

10. REVISION. To arrive at your final draft, revise and edit carefully. Follow the guidelines in Dr.
Jabbaras book, Chapter Eight: Revising. Also helpful is section 3 in Rules for Writers, which refers
you to many other sections of that explain what you can do to improve your academic writing.