Nalysis of Interpersonal Perceptual Skills.

Answer all parts of each assigned paper. Papers are to be 2 to 3 pages in length (no longer), word processed, 12 pt font, double-spaced, no cover page, no right justification and with one inch margins.
Paper #1: Analysis of Interpersonal Perceptual Skills.
1. A Think of a specific interpersonal interaction you have recently had with someone where you were engaged in a one of the perceptual barriers/biases. Describe the interaction and discuss how the barrier affected that interaction.
B. Discuss how this perceptual barrier/bias might generally affect your relationships with others.
C. Discuss specific strategies from the text or class that can be used overcome this barrier/bias.
2. Repeat step 1 (A,B,C) discussing a different perceptual barrier/bias type than used in #1.

I would like you to use these two perceptual barriers: a?stereotypea? and a?ignore informationa?
Stereotype: We Stereotype
Preconceived notions about what they expect to find may keep people from seeing whatas
before their eyes and ears. We see what we want to see, hear what we want to hear.
We stereotype others. To stereotype someone is to attribute a set of qualities to the per-
son because of his or her membership in some category. The word stereotype was origi-
nally a printing term, referring to a metal plate that was cast from type set by a printer.
The plate would print the same page of type over and over again. When we stereotype
people, we place them into inflexible, all-compassing categories. We a?printa? the same
judgments on anyone placed in a given category.
Stereotyping other people and then treating them unfairly is a significant prob-
lem in modern society. There is clear evidence that this problem is especially acute for
socially marginalized groups such as gays and lesbians and Blacks.23Being aware of the
problem is the first step to overcoming it.
We are more likely, according to communication researchers, to maintain our
stereotypes of others if we believe that the people with whom we typically interact also
share our stereotype.24 Why? People who hold a common stereotype reinforce one
anotheras thinking.

Ignore information: We Stereotype
Preconceived notions about what they expect to find may keep people from seeing whatas
before their eyes and ears. We see what we want to see, hear what we want to hear.
We stereotype others. To stereotype someone is to attribute a set of qualities to the per-
son because of his or her membership in some category. The word stereotype was origi-
nally a printing term, referring to a metal plate that was cast from type set by a printer.
The plate would print the same page of type over and over again. When we stereotype
people, we place them into inflexible, all-compassing categories. We a?printa? the same
judgments on anyone placed in a given category.
Stereotyping other people and then treating them unfairly is a significant prob-
lem in modern society. There is clear evidence that this problem is especially acute for
socially marginalized groups such as gays and lesbians and Blacks.23Being aware of the
problem is the first step to overcoming it.
We are more likely, according to communication researchers, to maintain our
stereotypes of others if we believe that the people with whom we typically interact also
share our stereotype.24 Why? People who hold a common stereotype reinforce one
anotheras thinking. We Stereotype
Preconceived notions about what they expect to find may keep people from seeing whatas
before their eyes and ears. We see what we want to see, hear what we want to hear.
We stereotype others. To stereotype someone is to attribute a set of qualities to the per-
son because of his or her membership in some category. The word stereotype was origi-
nally a printing term, referring to a metal plate that was cast from type set by a printer.
The plate would print the same page of type over and over again. When we stereotype
people, we place them into inflexible, all-compassing categories. We a?printa? the same
judgments on anyone placed in a given category.
Stereotyping other people and then treating them unfairly is a significant prob-
lem in modern society. There is clear evidence that this problem is especially acute for
socially marginalized groups such as gays and lesbians and Blacks.23Being aware of the
problem is the first step to overcoming it.
We are more likely, according to communication researchers, to maintain our
stereotypes of others if we believe that the people with whom we typically interact also
share our stereotype.24 Why? People who hold a common stereotype reinforce one
anotheras thinking.

Interpersonal communication is a distinctive, transactional form of human com-
munication involving mutual influence, usually for the purpose of managing relation-
ships. The three essential elements of this definition differentiate the unique nature of
interpersonal communication from other forms of human communication