Omestic Violence Against Women In 2010 Has A Greater Affect Than It Did 50 years ago

PROJECT STRUCTURE

The Independent Project should be organised as follows:

a?Title page (Independent Project title, your name and programme and the year)

a?Abstract (see below)

a?Acknowledgements

a?Table of Contents

a?List of Tables/Figures (if included)

a?List of Appendices (if included)

a?Introduction (see below)

a?Main body of the Independent Project (see below)

a?Conclusion (see below)

a?Reference List (see below)

a?Appendices (see below)

The Abstract is a brief summary (200 words) describing the topic under examination, it should explain the aims and methods of the study and provide a rA©sumA© of the main conclusions.

The Introduction should:

Introduce the topic and the type of issues it raises.

a?Outline why you choose this topic and the approach to its study.

a?State the objectives you initially had for the research and, if different, what you actually achieved.

a?Summarise the treatment of the topic, showing how the order and structure of the Independent Project supports your argument.

The Main Body of the Project must include:

a?A literature review. (Library-based Independent Projects need not have a separate a?literature reviewa section, as such, as the main content of the work concerns the literature.)

a?Discussion about the methodology followed and/or discussion of your theoretical approach to the subject matter, as well as research ethics

a?A report on the analysis of the research.
However, there is considerable flexibility about how the Independent Project is structured but the discussion should have a logical progression.

The Conclusion must follow from prior sections, and must not contain statements not previously argued. It should contain a summary of the main arguments, drawing together the themes and issues raised in the Independent Project and relating them to the stated objectives of the research.

In some cases, the conclusion may also contain recommendations, which should be constrained by what is feasible and considered in the context of their social, economic, political and other implications.

Appendices should contain additional and relevant information that supports the arguments constructed in the main body of the report. Appendices do not count towards the word length of the Independent Project. They must not contain detail essential for your argument, but as supporting material should be signalled within the main body of text at appropriate points. Each appendix should be given a title indicating its contents and numbered (Appendix 1, and so on.). Donat make the appendices too long.

The Reference must list, alphabetically by author, all books, articles, and other sources on which you have drawn in the project. These sources of material must be properly referenced within the text. Referencing your work means that you indicate the sources where you have found information or arguments that you refer to in your assignment. This applies to quotes, paraphrased material and to making general reference to a book or article.

Omestic Violence Against Women In 2010 Has A Greater Affect Than It Did 50 years ago.

PROJECT STRUCTURE
The Independent Project should be organised as follows:
a?Title page (Independent Project title, your name and programme and the year)

a?Abstract (see below)

.Acknowledgements

.Table of Contents

a?List of Tables/Figures (if included)

a?List of Appendices (if included)

a? Introduction (see below)

a? Main body of the Independent Project (see below)

a? Conclusion (see below)

a? Reference List (see below)

a? Appendices (see below)

The Abstract is a brief summary (200 words) describing the topic under examination, it should explain the aims and methods of the study and provide a rA©sumA© of the main conclusions.

1)The Introduction should:

Introduce the topic and the type of issues it raises.

a? Outline why you choose this topic and the approach to its study.

a? State the objectives you initially had for the research and, if different, what you actually achieved.

a? Summarise the treatment of the topic, showing how the order and structure of the Independent Project supports your argument.

2)The Main Body of the Project must include:

a? A literature review. (Library-based Independent Projects need not have a separate a?literature reviewa section, as such, as the main content of the work concerns the literature.)

a? Discussion about the methodology followed and/or discussion of your theoretical approach to the subject matter, as well as research ethics

a? A report on the analysis of the research.

However, there is considerable flexibility about how the Independent Project is structured but the discussion should have a logical progression.

3)The Conclusion must follow from prior sections, and must not contain statements not previously argued. It should contain a summary of the main arguments, drawing together the themes and issues raised in the Independent Project and relating them to the stated objectives of the research.

In some cases, the conclusion may also contain recommendations, which should be constrained by what is feasible and considered in the context of their social, economic, political and other implications.

4)Appendices should contain additional and relevant information that supports the arguments constructed in the main body of the report. Appendices do not count towards the word length of the Independent Project. They must not contain detail essential for your argument, but as supporting material should be signalled within the main body of text at appropriate points. Each appendix should be given a title indicating its contents and numbered (Appendix 1, and so on.). Donat make the appendices too long.

5)The Reference must list, alphabetically by author, all books, articles, and other sources on which you have drawn in the project. These sources of material must be properly referenced within the text. Referencing your work means that you indicate the sources where you have found information or arguments that you refer to in your assignment. This applies to quotes, paraphrased material and to making general reference to a book or article.