Ommunicable Diseases for District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia

Please add to and update the info below. I need a brief history on pandemic/epidemic. Also update pandemic/epidemic of DC, MD, and VA. I need all info updated from 1918-2015.

PANDEMIC/EPIDEMIC HISTORICAL DATA

A pandemic is a global disease outbreak. HIV/AIDS is an example of one of the most destructive global pandemics in history.

An epidemic occurs when an infectious disease spreads rapidly to many people.

In Maryland the Great Pandemic first appeared at Camp Meade on September 17, 1918. By September 28, more than 1,700 cases were reported across the state. Nearly 2,000 cases were reported in Baltimore on October 10. Sickness often led to death. On the single day of October 19, 169 people perished because of the pandemic. Hospitals were overwhelmed. Flu patients filled six wards at Johns Hopkins. Finally, the hospital had to close its doors. By the most conservative of counts, at least 75,000 of Baltimorei??s 600,000 residents were struck by the flu. More than 2,000 died. Circumstances were just as terrible all across the state. In Salisbury (located on Marylands eastern peninsula), about 800 of the towni??s 11,000 residents were struck by the pandemic. Forty-one percent of the population became ill in the town of Cumberland.

Navy personnel in Virginia were afflicted with influenza in early September. By the last week of September, the pandemic had taken hold in Newport News, Norfolk, Petersburg, and Portsmouth. By mid-October, Virginia had seen more than 200,000 cases of influenza. By the end of the year, more than 15,000 Virginians had died.

The District of Columbia was affected in the last week of September. More than 160 cases were reported on October 1. By October 8, more than 2,100 people had been attacked by the flu. Four hundred forty victims of influenza were reported on the second week of October. More than 730 victims were reported the following week.

In 2003, the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic took the lives of nearly 800 people worldwide.