Ommunity Health Advocacy Project a Part Three

Hello Writer
This is a continuation part from the previous job, I will paste first the instruction for this part and later Part One and Part Two, but this work should be related to Part One

Instruction for Part 3
Write a short description of the three levels of prevention.
Apply the three levels of prevention to your aggregateas health concern.
Include a specific example of your initiative in action for each level. For example, if your aggregate and health concern were teens with high blood pressure, and example of an initiative in action for secondary prevention would include a blood pressure screening.
Select the best theoretical model that will help you answer, or provide the rationale for, why you asked the questions you did in Part One of the Weekly Guide. This will help you address your advocacy concerns. Consider the following questions.
Main concepts of a theoretical model is identified and a description of how these concepts apply to the questions, aggregate and health concern identified is presented.

Now this is Part One
Part One

Community Health Advocacy Project a Part One
In community health or public health nursing identifying an aggregate is the most essential step. The identification of an aggregate will help in applying nursing and medical concepts to research effectively. An aggregate is a large population sharing common characteristics or possessing common medical conditions. The aggregate selected for this assignment is the elderly with depression. Depression is not a normal characteristic of aging; however, it is a common one. The symptoms of depression influence every aspect of life and most often go unrecognized preventing the acquisition of much needed help. This paper will address depression in the elderly population and the impact that it oftentimes has with regard to the family, health centers, and the society as a whole.
Statistics
More than two million of the 34 million Americans age 65 and older suffer from some form of depression, in which depression is the leading cause of suicide. It is also of note that 58% of the population aged 65 and older believe that depression is normal in aging (2009 Mental Health America).
Why this aggregate?
The elderly and their symptoms of depression are often overlooked because the symptoms are often masked by other illnesses. Chronic medical conditions that are disabling, painful, or life-threatening can result in depression or worsen its symptoms. Some of the illnesses that increase the chance of depression are cancer, stroke, heart disease, Parkinsonas disease, dementia, and Alzheimeras disease. It is also important to note that many of the drugs used to treat these illnesses have depression as a side effect.
Other common causes of depression in the elderly are related to loneliness or isolation as a result of living alone or a reduced social circle because of relocation or deaths. A very common cause is the reduced sense of purpose that can be due to physical limitations or retirement.
One of the prime determinants frequently not considered is the impact or the negative stigma attached to depression within the elderly population. It is the general consensus that these individuals are a tax and drain upon the resources and energies of those within the family or the society who are charged with their care (Popovic et al, 2008).
One of the most important means by which depression within the elderly population can be lessened is with regard to this feeling of worthlessness and drain that many of these individuals actively engage in (Farrel, 1997). Although it is not always the case, the impact, and role that family members and the close network of friends and support groups that elderly individuals rely upon are the most actionable means by which feelings of worth and well-being can be maximized.
The key questions regarding depression within the elderly that should be answered are concentric around whether or not these individuals are sole survivors, whether or not they have close friends or family with which to interact, and the degree to which health care constraints and maintenance of their own health factor into the overall likelihood and evidence of depression within their respective lives (Chung, 2008). Accordingly, three salient questions will be put forward within this analysis that will seek to understand this aggregate population to a better and more complete degree as a means of finding key areas of strength in which the needs of this population can be addressed.
1. Are there any commonalities between evidence of depression and specific diseases/health maladies or is it a general trend that is impacted upon by situational factors outside of health realities?
2. To what extent does the existence of family and some form of other support system impact upon the existence of depression within the elderly community?
3. Is there any prior research or case studies that have been conducted that promote clear and actionable means by which healthcare providers can seek to impact upon the existence of depression within the elderly from a non-pharmacological or counseling standpoint?
4. How do we proactively recognize the early signs of depression and distinguish them from dementia where the two can be superimposed on each other?


Part Two
Community Health Advocacy Project Part 2
The well-being of a community is dependent on public health personnel as protectors of its continued existence. A community is a group of persons that share similar goals, work together with civility, and have communal conscience (Garvey, 1992). For public health practitioners to protect the communityas well-being there has to be change in accordance with necessary decisions. An aggregate is a group of persons that abide by programs and operate through stridency (Garvey, 1992). The difference between the two is based on what is needed and what is desired. Depression in the elderly is a threat that public health practitioners try to neutralize and contain. As seen in the earlier study of this aggregate, statistics for the elderly suffering from depression is alarming and if there are no counter-measures to contain it, the duty of the practitioners is irrelevant. In this study, methods applied to curb this threat will be dependent on Christoffelas three stages in a conceptual framework for advocacy.
To understand the frameworks of advocacy, an understanding of what it consists of must be achieved. In definition, it is the application of scientific evidence in making decisions on particular issues. In public health, the definition is the same, but the goal is to solve problems related to public health in order to reduce the disability rate or death. Advocacy sometimes lobbies for change, which makes people uneasy leading to opposition.
Advocacy exists in three stages, information, strategy, and action. These stages are dependent on each other and in order for any to work the previous has to be successful. The first step, which is information, means that public health gathers information on the issue affecting the public (Goldsmith & Institute of Medicine, 2002). Government agencies gather the data and come up with statistics on what problem is affecting public health from where public health practitioners take over. The public health practitioners with the help of the government agencies discuss and come up with a method to tackle the identified problem. The latter is the second stage after which the third stage follows (Kausler, Kausler, Krupsaw & Kausler, 2007). The third stage is the most crucial and it involves putting the strategy developed in the second stage into action (Wisocki, 1991).
To strategize how to reduce depression, an understanding of what causes depression among the elderly has to be under scrutiny. Studies show that the feeling of worthlessness, retirement, and medication are the main causes. The reduction of depression, therefore, depends on eliminating and downplaying these factors. This is possible via public education, encouraging living family members and relatives to get the elderly more involved in decision ma

Ommunity Health Advocacy Project a Part Three

The levels of prevention in epidemiology help provide a framework for health professionals to intervene and prevent disease, injury, or disability.

Write a short description of the three levels of prevention.

Apply the three levels of prevention to your aggregateas health concern.

Include a specific example of your initiative in action for each level.

Select the best theoretical model that will help you answer, or provide the rationale for, why you asked the questions you did in Part One of the Weekly Guide. This will help you address your advocacy concerns. Consider the following questions:

a? What are the main concepts within the model?
a? What about theory explains why you asked those questions.