Ompare 1. Original Article see details ABCD must be answered

Compare 1. Original Article Sadder and Less Accurate? False Memory for Negative Material in Depression.And its opposing #2 Articles

ABCD must be clear.


A. Explain how the professional journal article you selected(2) defends its opposing view from the (1.)Original article.

B. For each article, explain any biases, slants in opinions, and any other errors in logic that are present. Be specific and provide examples from the literature.

C. Explain how, if at all, reading the opposing article changed your views on the topic presented in the original article.

D. Explain the importance of applying critical thinking to the reading of psychological research and professional literature.

1. Article: Joormann, J., Teachman, B. A., & Gotlib, I. H. (2009). Sadder and less accurate? False memory for negative material in depression. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 118(2), 412-417.
2. Article: Howe, M. L., & Malone, C. (2011). Mood-congruent true and false memory: Effects of depression. Memory, 19(2), 192-201. doi:10.1080/09658211.2010.544073

1. Article: Joormann, J., Teachman, B. A., & Gotlib, I. H. (2009). Sadder and less accurate? False memory for negative material in depression. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 118(2), 412-417.
Previous research has demonstrated that induced sad mood is associated with increased accuracy of recall in certain memory tasks; the effects of clinical depression, however, are likely to be quite different. The authors used the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to examine the impact of clinical depression on erroneous recall of neutral and/or emotional stimuli. Specifically, they presented Deese-Roediger-McDermott lists that were highly associated with negative, neutral, or positive lures and compared participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder and nondepressed control participants on the accuracy of their recall of presented material and their false recall of never-presented lures. Compared with control participants, major depressive disorder participants recalled fewer words that had been previously presented but were more likely to falsely recall negative lures; there were no differences between major depressive disorder and control participants in false recall of positive or neutral lures. These findings indicate that depression is associated with false memories of negative material.

2. . Article: Howe, M. L., & Malone, C. (2011). Mood-congruent true and false memory: Effects of depression. Memory, 19(2), 192-201. doi:10.1080/09658211.2010.544073

The Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm was used to investigate the effect of depression on true and false recognition. In this experiment true and false recognition was examined across positive, neutral, negative, and depression-relevant lists for individuals with and without a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Results showed that participants with major depressive disorder falsely recognised significantly more depression-relevant words than non-depressed controls. These findings also parallel recent research using recall instead of recognition and show that there are clear mood congruence effects for depression on false memory performance.




Readings
a?Article: Joormann, J., Teachman, B. A., & Gotlib, I. H. (2009). Sadder and less accurate? False memory for negative material in depression. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 118(2), 412a 417.
Retrieved from the Walden Library using the PsycARTICLES database.
a?Article: Walden Online Writing Center. (2009). Avoiding logical fallacies. Retrieved from htm