Ompare and constrast Jesus Christ and Buddha

GUIDELINES: Compare and contrast Buddha and Jesus as founders of their respective religious traditions. Develop some specific points of comparison based from the reading materials I attached and then develop your analysis. No outside sources please. Do use point by point comparison, and third person throughout the entire essay. No works cited page needed, only intext citation, i.e. (title of article or textbook title, pg # if available)
ESSAY FORMAT:
Intro Paragraph: needs to clearly set up the paper by explicitly introducing the issue of the paper, why this issue matters, and then needs to present a solid thesis, i.e. your tentative answer/response to the question inherent in the issue/problem youve posed.
1. Hook
2. Introduce the issue: The essay should be about some problem, question or issue that the paper will seek to explore/ propose an answer to. The central debatable question your essay will answer.
3. Thesis: your tentative answer/response to the question inherent in the issue/problem youve posed. Include three to four points of comparison that will be talked about in each paragraph, i.e. attitude toward the human self, understanding of what happens after a person dies, ethic-the role of contemplation.
Body paragraphs: Need to be 2/3 of a page, minimum of four paragraphs.
1. 1. Topic sentence that includes one point of comparison.
2. Then point by point, what Jesus thinks, on the other hand, what Buddha thinks about this point of comparison.
3. Then wrap up the paragraph and transition to the next paragraph and the next point of comparison.
Conclusion:
1. Restate your main point
2. Echo a powerful image or quotation from an authority mentioned earlier in the essay.
3. Complete the framea refer back to the strategy you used in the introduction.
4. Recommend a course of actiona what do you want your reader to do, think, believe?
5. Bring us up to date on your topic and/ or make a prediction.
6. Ask a real or rhetorical question.
7. Reiterate the significance of your topic.
8. Draw a conclusiona i.e. based on what youve said, what are the implications? What inferences/ conclusions should your reader draw from what youve said?

Attached Readings:
Text book Reading # 1:

82
C H A P T E R
4
Theravada Buddhisma
The Middle Way
_
INTRODUCTION
As with Hinduism, the name a?Buddhisma? is a somewhat misleading attempt to
organize an array of diverse religious traditions. Like a?Hindus,a? a?Buddhistsa? call
themselves followers of the dharma (or dhamma in the Pali language). However, the
Buddhist understanding is quite different from Hindu teaching, and disagreements
among followers of the Buddha about the meaning of dhamma are found.
Buddhism began in India in the sixth century B.C.E., and its early development
occurred in South Asia. However, as we shall see, it faded as a separate religion in
India (although it has been revived in India in recent decades), and survived principally
because it spread from India and took root in other cultures of Southeast
and East Asia. Today, Buddhism is a global religion.
As it evolved, Buddhism divided into two branches, often called the two
a?vehicles.a? In this chapter we will study the first phase of Buddhism, tracing its origin
and early development and discussing the texts and teachings of Theravadaa a
representative school of the earliest of the two major branches of Buddhism, which
flourishes today in the island nation of Sri Lanka and several countries of Southeast
Asia. This branch of Buddhism is also called Hinayana (a?the small vehiclea?). In
Chapter Eight we will study the other segment of Buddhism, called Mahayana (a?the
large vehiclea?), which thrives in a variety of separate movements in East Asia.
STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT AND SACRED TEXTS
Founder: Siddartha Gautama
a?Buddhisma? had a single founder, a remarkable teacher who discovered and shared
with others a path to liberation from the cycle of rebirth that is appropriately called
a?the middle way.a? Whatever their differences, all a?Buddhistsa? join in honoring this
CHAPTER 4 _ THERAVADA BUDDHISMa THE MIDDLE WAY 83
man. Buddhists may differ dramatically on their understanding of the nature of the
founderas teachings and the significance of his life, but a principal factor that distinguishes
them from other religions is their focus on this man.
Gautama was his family name; his parents called him Siddartha. He was born in
about 563 B.C.E., a member of the warrior caste (kshatriya), not far from the holy city
of Varanasi (Benares) in northern India. We have little information about his life
that historians would accept as certain beyond a doubt; legends fill the void. What
follows is the religious biography his followers wrote.
Siddarthaas wealthy father, a chieftain of the Sakya clan, desperately wanted him
to become the emperor of India. According to one tradition, a soothsayer told his
father that Siddartha was fated to become either a great political leader or a homeless
monk. To ensure the former, his father raised Siddartha in luxury, protecting
him from the unpleasantness of life that might raise religious questions in his mind.
Siddartha married a lovely princess and she gave birth to a son. At the instructions
of Siddarthaas father, servants carefully screened the poor, sick, and dying from his
sight.
Despite all the affluence, Gautama began to feel an inner longing, an emptiness
he could not fill with wine and song or even the pleasures of family life. He began
to venture out alone, without his a?advance party.a? As his chariot journeyed through
an a?unsanitizeda? area, Siddartha experienced what Buddhist tradition calls a?the
four passing sights.a? The first was a sorrowful old man. The second was a man
racked by illness. The third was a dead man being carried on a funeral pyre. For the
first time in his life Siddartha had seen that life is not all pleasure and joy, but includes
misery, suffering, and death. And he realized that he too was destined to
grow old, become ill, and die. His despair continued to deepen until one day he saw
the a?fourth sight,a? a monk, calmly walking alone in a yellow robe.
One night Siddartha crept out of his palace, leaving behind his wife and son.
This turning point in the Buddhaas life is called a?the great renunciation.a? He shaved
his head, clothed himself in the robes of a monk and set off to discover the way to
escape the inevitable suffering of material existence. Thus began a six-year quest. He
started out with an open mind about the teaching of the Hindu brahmins. First, he
tried and mastered a meditative approach such as that implied in the Upanishads,
but to no avail. Then he tried rigid asceticism, similar to the teaching of the Jains
(see Chapter Five). For five years he denied himself, to the point that his diet consisted
of a single grain of rice a day. Five other ascetics joined him, only to watch as
he fainted dead away beside a stream. When he revived, Siddartha determined that
self-denial would not lead to spiritual fulfillment. He accepted a meal and vowed not
to deny himself to such an extreme. This left him in a quandary; neither of the commonly
accepted paths to spiritual awareness had succeeded.
Not far from a place in northeastern India now known as Bodh Gaya, Siddartha
sat down under a fig tree (known to Buddhist tradition as the bodhi or enlightenment
tree). He told himself he would not arise until he reached a state of spiritual
enlightenment. According to Buddhist legend, as he sat, Mara, the god of desire
and death, appeared to him and tempted him to turn back to his old life of pleasure.
However, Siddartha remained firm in his quest. He pointed to the earth with
his right hand, as if to call upon the earth to be his witness. At that moment, now
aware that it was desire that had kept him entrapped, he suddenly a?awakeneda? to a
new life beyond its grip. He was now a Buddha, one who had a?woken up.a? He was
enlightened. The

Ompare and constrast Jesus Christ and Buddha

To whom it may concern,

The guidelines are as follows:
Main Essay Assignment:
Write a 6 page, 1500 word minimum, on the prompt below:

Compare and contrast Buddha and Jesus as founders of their respective religious traditions. To do so, youll need to develop some specific points of comparison and then base your analysis from the attached prompts, #1, 2, 3, 4, (only from these four Prompts, no other outside sources Please. thanks). Do use point by point comparison. Then reflecta what did you learn about these two figures, about these two religious traditions, and about religion in general and interfaith dialogue in particular by doing this comparison contrast? What surprised you? What difference does this make to your understanding of religion? As you write the essay, be sure to use specific examples from the essays below, and any other Primary text and secondary text Attached to this message only. Thanks

PS.

For this assignment, it is important to distinguish between primary and secondary texts. For example, the writings within the New Testament or Buddhist scriptures are primary texts. The writings about Jesus and Buddha by other scholars/ thinkers are secondary texts. Secondary texts interpret history, events, people, and primary texts offering a perspective on them.

As you work on this essay, youll need to carefully consider balancing primary and secondary sources in your analysis. For example, to use primary sources for the analysis of Jesus but only secondary sources for the analysis of the Buddha (or vice versa) is not an even-handed approach.

Ok Below are the attached prompts:

Attached Prompt #1(primary)
Theravada Buddhisma
The Middle Way
_
INTRODUCTION
As with Hinduism, the name a?Buddhisma? is a somewhat misleading attempt to
organize an array of diverse religious traditions. Like a?Hindus,a? a?Buddhistsa? call
themselves followers of the dharma (or dhamma in the Pali language). However, the
Buddhist understanding is quite different from Hindu teaching, and disagreements
among followers of the Buddha about the meaning of dhamma are found.
Buddhism began in India in the sixth century B.C.E., and its early development
occurred in South Asia. However, as we shall see, it faded as a separate religion in
India (although it has been revived in India in recent decades), and survived principally
because it spread from India and took root in other cultures of Southeast
and East Asia. Today, Buddhism is a global religion.
As it evolved, Buddhism divided into two branches, often called the two
a?vehicles.a? In this chapter we will study the first phase of Buddhism, tracing its origin
and early development and discussing the texts and teachings of Theravadaa a
representative school of the earliest of the two major branches of Buddhism, which
flourishes today in the island nation of Sri Lanka and several countries of Southeast
Asia. This branch of Buddhism is also called Hinayana (a?the small vehiclea?). In
Chapter Eight we will study the other segment of Buddhism, called Mahayana (a?the
large vehiclea?), which thrives in a variety of separate movements in East Asia.
STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT AND SACRED TEXTS
Founder: Siddartha Gautama
a?Buddhisma? had a single founder, a remarkable teacher who discovered and shared
with others a path to liberation from the cycle of rebirth that is appropriately called
a?the middle way.a? Whatever their differences, all a?Buddhistsa? join in honoring this
CHAPTER 4 _ THERAVADA BUDDHISMa THE MIDDLE WAY 83
man. Buddhists may differ dramatically on their understanding of the nature of the
founderas teachings and the significance of his life, but a principal factor that distinguishes
them from other religions is their focus on this man.
Gautama was his family name; his parents called him Siddartha. He was born in
about 563 B.C.E., a member of the warrior caste (kshatriya), not far from the holy city
of Varanasi (Benares) in northern India. We have little information about his life
that historians would accept as certain beyond a doubt; legends fill the void. What
follows is the religious biography his followers wrote.
Siddarthaas wealthy father, a chieftain of the Sakya clan, desperately wanted him
to become the emperor of India. According to one tradition, a soothsayer told his
father that Siddartha was fated to become either a great political leader or a homeless
monk. To ensure the former, his father raised Siddartha in luxury, protecting
him from the unpleasantness of life that might raise religious questions in his mind.
Siddartha married a lovely princess and she gave birth to a son. At the instructions
of Siddarthaas father, servants carefully screened the poor, sick, and dying from his
sight.
Despite all the affluence, Gautama began to feel an inner longing, an emptiness
he could not fill with wine and song or even the pleasures of family life. He began
to venture out alone, without his a?advance party.a? As his chariot journeyed through
an a?unsanitizeda? area, Siddartha experienced what Buddhist tradition calls a?the
four passing sights.a? The first was a sorrowful old man. The second was a man
racked by illness. The third was a dead man being carried on a funeral pyre. For the
first time in his life Siddartha had seen that life is not all pleasure and joy, but includes
misery, suffering, and death. And he realized that he too was destined to
grow old, become ill, and die. His despair continued to deepen until one day he saw
the a?fourth sight,a? a monk, calmly walking alone in a yellow robe.
One night Siddartha crept out of his palace, leaving behind his wife and son.
This turning point in the Buddhaas life is called a?the great renunciation.a? He shaved
his head, clothed himself in the robes of a monk and set off to discover the way to
escape the inevitable suffering of material existence. Thus began a six-year quest. He
started out with an open mind about the teaching of the Hindu brahmins. First, he
tried and mastered a meditative approach such as that implied in the Upanishads,
but to no avail. Then he tried rigid asceticism, similar to the teaching of the Jains
(see Chapter Five). For five years he denied himself, to the point that his diet consisted
of a single grain of rice a day. Five other ascetics joined him, only to watch as
he fainted dead away beside a stream. When he revived, Siddartha determined that
self-denial would not lead to spiritual fulfillment. He accepted a meal and vowed not
to deny himself to such an extreme. This left him in a quandary; neither of the commonly
accepted paths to spiritual awareness had succeeded.
Not far from a place in northeastern India now known as Bodh Gaya, Siddartha
sat down under a fig tree (known to Buddhist tradition as the bodhi or enlightenment
tree). He told himself he would not arise until he reached a state of spiritual
enlightenment. According to Buddhist legend, as he sat, Mara, the god of desire
and death, appeared to him and tempted him to turn back to his old life of pleasure.
However, Siddartha remained firm in his quest. He pointed to the earth with
his right hand, as if to call upon the earth to be his witness. At that moment, now
aware that it was desire that had kept him entrapped, he suddenly a?awakeneda? to a
new life beyond its grip. He was now a Buddha, one who had a?woken up.a? He was
enlightened. The state of desirelessness he now entered was nirvana.
Siddartha Gautama, Buddha, now faced another momentous decision. Should
he tell others the new way of ordering life (dhamma) he had discovered, or should
84 SECTION II _ THE WORLDaS RELIGIONS
he keep it to himself, allow his existing karma (kamma in Pali) to dissipate, so that he
could enter into the state beyond rebirth (parinirvana)? His fateful choice was to
communicate his teaching to others, so that they too could follow the path to awakening.
His first students were the five ascetics, who had left him disgustedly when
they saw him a