Onceptualization of supervision case (fictitious)

Conceptualization of a Supervision Case

1. Compose a fictitious case in supervision (you are the supervisor) that you conceptualize using the integrated model of supervision. Example client a? Minnie Mouse is a 35-year old European American divorced etc.
2. Your Supervisee is a second-year Master level student in his or her final two weeks of classes etc

You must include the following: and use only provided resources below
a? Provide relevant information (generic, no real names) that identifies client
a? Describe superviseeas level of experience
a? Identify theoretical supervision model used
a? Describe how you structured the supervisory feedback session with supervisee
a? Provide clear case conceptualization
a? Address session content (and process, if this is family therapy)
a? Relay any useful feedback that you provided to supervisee
a? Relay that you encouraged questions from supervisee to you
a? Illustrate that you maintained focus
a? Describe being supportive of supervisee
a? Describe how you gently challenged supervisee
a? Illustrate that you watched out for client(s)
a? Describe how you were multiculturally responsive
a? Describe how you encouraged feedback on yourself as supervisor
a? Describe how you focused on superviseeas behavior
a? Describe how you provided suggestions to supervisee
a? Illustrate how you maintained flexibility
a? Describe how you assisted supervisee with goal definition
a? Demonstrate that you conveyed respect of supervisee and client(s)
a? Identify and address any ethical/legal issues

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