Oncrete perfomance in fire compared to other building materials

DISSERTATION PROPOSAL
1) Topic
Concrete perfomance in fire compared to other building materials


2) Back ground
Concrete is the most commonly used building material in the world, yet we normally take what it does for granted too often this means that much of what concrete can offer is overlooked. Now it is time to take a fresh look at the new world of concrete as it used more than any other material in the world, proper management and supervision of its use and application in construction determines its success.
Concrete is one of the most versatile, durable and cost-effective building materials known to man. It is also environmentally sustainable, with green credentials that outperform both steel and timber.
The UK is self-sufficient in, and a net exporter of, concrete. Unlike steel, the UK is able to produce almost all the concrete it needs domestically. This self-sufficiency enhances concretes sustainability by minimising the need for transport and supporting the UK economy
Concrete is a completely non-combustible (classified an A1 fire resistant material under EN 13501-1) and has a slow rate of heat transfer, making it a highly effective barrier to the spread of fire.








3) Introduction
Fire is one of the most destructive loads a structural element can be exposed to.Concrete provides the best fire resistance of any building material. It does not burn, it cannot be set on fire like other materials in a building and it does not emit any toxic fumes, smoke or drip molten particles when exposed to fire. Concrete and its mineral constituents enjoy the highest fire resistance classification (class A1) under EN 13501-1.
This excellent fire performance is due in the main to concretes constituent materials (i.e. cement and aggregates) which, when chemically combined, form a material that is essentially inert and has poor thermal conductivity. It is this slow rate of heat transfer that enables concrete to act as an effective fire shield not only between adjacent spaces but also to protect itself from fire damage.
The only potential risk to life safety from concrete in fire occurs in the form of spalling, which principally affects High Performance and Ultra High Performance Concrete. Even here, effective measures can be taken to reduce the probability of spalling
Its commonly understood in the building industry that concrete is the most fire-resistant building material in everyday use. Concrete provides the best fire resistance of any building material. It does not burn, it cannot be set on fire like other materials in a building and it does not emit any toxic fumes, smoke or drip molten particles when exposed to fire. Concrete and its mineral constituents enjoy the highest fire resistance classification (class A1) under EN 13501-1.
This excellent fire performance is due in the main to concretes constituent materials (i.e. cement and aggregates) which, when chemically combined, form a material that is essentially inert and has poor thermal conductivity. It is this slow rate of heat transfer that enables concrete to act as an effective fire shield not only between adjacent spaces but also to protect itself from fire damage.
The only potential risk to life safety from concrete in fire occurs in the form of spalling, which principally affects High Performance and Ultra High Performance Concrete. Even here, effective measures can be taken to reduce the probability of spalling.
Concrete is in fact one of the sustainable building materials in terms of both energy consumed during manufacture and its inherent thermal mass properties in use. The cement and concrete sector is making a concerted, co-ordinated effort to further reduce its environmental impact. This includes the growing use of recycled concrete in cement and concrete manufacture.
Looking ahead, concrete construction has the potential to make a massive, positive contribution to the UKs effort to reduce its CO2 emissions in the near and longer term. It offers the key to lowering energy consumption (and therefore carbon emissions) by minimising the need for air-conditioning in offices and by providing the highest standards of insulation for Britains next generation of sustainable homes.
Because of concretes high specific heat capacity, a fire will generally not cause a rapid increase in its temperature and may not cause significant damage. Even so, Using concrete wisely can help address one of the major challenges of our time  how to design and construct high-performance buildings that deliver genuine sustainability.




4) Aim
To investigate the effects of fire even though concrete is completely rated as a non-combustible (classified an A1 fire resistant material under EN 13501-1) and has a slow rate of heat transfer, making it a highly effective barrier to the spread of fire
5) Objectives

The intention of this research is to achieve the following:

” To investigate the damage effects of fire in Concrete
” How to improve the fire resistance of concrete
” Concrete s performance in fire
” Protecting people
” Concrete and fire safety engineering
6) Hypothesis

Fire and concrete are two words in the construction industry most people don t hear about together very often and the effects of fire on concrete are not well understood and there is a lack of information needed to design concrete structures strong enough to withstand such conditions.
7) Methodology

The research will make use of mainly quantitative and to a lesser extent qualitative methods. The methodology is divided into two main areasthe case study and the overall analysis.
A) Secondary Data Sources.
A variety of sources for information will include books, journals and the internet, documented data from government, academic institutions, consultancy firms and construction firms will also be used.
B) Case Studies



C) Primary Data Sources.
The following key methods for data collection will be used and these are
1) Surveys
2) Individual Interviews
3) Observation
8) Structure of the Dissertation

This research will be divided into the following chapters

” Chapter 1. Introduction
” Chapter 2.
” Chapter 3.
” Chapter 4.
” Chapter 5.
” Chapter 6.
” Chapter 7.
” Chapter 8.
” Chapter 9.
” Chapter10.
” References.

Work Plan






Bibliography

Naoum, S. G. (Shamil G.) Dissertation research and writing for construction students / S.G. Naoum. 2nd ed. Amsterdam; London: Butterworth-Heinemann, 2007.  0750682647

Walliman, Nicholas S. R. Your undergraduate dissertation: the essential guide for success / Nicholas. London: SAGE, 2004.  0761941401


Swetnam, Derek writing your dissertation: how to plan, prepare and present successful work. 3rd ed. Oxford: How to Books, 2000.

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