Ontinuum of care for maternal, newborn, and child health: from slogan to service delivery

Notes to guide your critical summary:
The critical summary is the first assignment in the semester portfolio to address an issue
relating to social inclusion. These serve as the basis for all future assignments (i.e., the
oral presentation, business report and persuasive essay). Note: group members need to
collaborate on the assigned social inclusion issue to carefully choose aspects that
complement one another. The critical summary will commence the exploration of sources
addressing this issue and will apprentice learners into research skills necessary in the
university.

Summaries should be written using complete, full sentences and integrate academic
vocabulary as necessary. Each summary should be concise (i.e. 500 words not including
citation) and adequately summarise and critically evaluate the main points of the text.
To maintain the word count limits, students will have to distinguish the most significant
and relevant details and organise language statically.
Critical Summary:
Main Purpose
Foregrounds the type of text and concisely summarises the texti??s main point
Background
Elaborates on the main point by providing major and minor supporting information
immediately crucial to an understanding of the texti??s main purpose
Summary of Key Finding
Further elaborates on the main point by outlining the most salient information required
to understand the Main Purpose and Background information
Significance Statement
Evaluative comment stating the significance of the text to the research of the social
inclusion issue.

Model of a Critical Summary:
Australian Bureau of Statistics 2012. The right person for the job: The relevance
of qualifications to employment. cat. no. 4102.0, ABS, Canberra, viewed
24 February 2013,
/pdf
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Added on 13.01.2015 08:53
Notes to guide your critical summary:
The critical summary is the first assignment in the semester portfolio to address an issue
relating to social inclusion. These serve as the basis for all future assignments (i.e., the
oral presentation, business report and persuasive essay). Note: group members need to
collaborate on the assigned social inclusion issue to carefully choose aspects that
complement one another. The critical summary will commence the exploration of sources
addressing this issue and will apprentice learners into research skills necessary in the
university.

Summaries should be written using complete, full sentences and integrate academic
vocabulary as necessary. Each summary should be concise (i.e. 500 words not including
citation) and adequately summarise and critically evaluate the main points of the text.
To maintain the word count limits, students will have to distinguish the most significant
and relevant details and organise language statically.
Critical Summary:
Main Purpose
Foregrounds the type of text and concisely summarises the text s main point
Background
Elaborates on the main point by providing major and minor supporting information
immediately crucial to an understanding of the text s main purpose
Summary of Key Finding
Further elaborates on the main point by outlining the most salient information required
to understand the Main Purpose and Background information
Significance Statement
Evaluative comment stating the significance of the text to the research of the social
inclusion issue.

Model of a Critical Summary:
Australian Bureau of Statistics 2012. The right person for the job: The relevance
of qualifications to employment. cat. no. 4102.0, ABS, Canberra, viewed
24 February 2013,
.
This report examines the correlation of education qualification with occupation
field in terms of job-matching. In recent decades, the demand for vocational and
higher education qualifications has increased, resulting in a concurrent increase in
the number of working-age people with these qualifications. For example, from
2001 to 2011, the proportion of Australians between 15-64 years with Certificate
I to Postgraduate degrees increased from 47% to 57%. However, many of these
employees work in a field with little relevance to their qualifications and are thus
unable to fully utilise their capabilities.
This empirical study examines job-matching from several angles, including
variation according to age and sex (men aged 20-24 and 55-64 are less likely to
job-match, 71% and 72%, compared to men aged 25-54, 81%; no effect for
women), hours worked (82% of full time workers; 71% of part-time workers),
qualification type (university-qualified employees 85%; vocationally-qualified
75%), field of study (healthcare 91%; education, architecture and building 85%;
agriculture and environmental 58%; creative arts 64%), occupation
(professionals 93%; labourers 46%), industry (education and training 91%;
professional, scientific and technical services 89%; health care and social
assistance 88%; transport, postal and warehousing 59%), and income (highest
earning quintile 88%; second quintile 58%).
The significance of this study is to underscore the long-term impact of educational
investments and occupation alignment on Australian workers prosperity. Thus,
this report effectively argues for the need for educational programs aimed at
ensuring qualification and occupation alignment.here is the link for text:20071003lancet.pdf