Ow Can Diet Help Prevent Heart Attacks?

NOTE: PLEASE ALL COPIES OF THE MATERIALS USED TO WRITE THIS RESEARCH PAPER MUST
BE EMAILED TO ME INCLUDING THE PAGES USED FOR SUBMISSION ALONG WITH MY RESEARCH PAPER.


Use this four headings for the research paper: they must be discussed in the paper.

1. What foods cause heart attacks and should be avoided? or how do they cause heart attacks? what are they? e.g Fat
2. What foods help prevent heart attacks?
3. What is a healthy diet? (balance of food)
4. Where can people get help with their diet? how can people over 50 years benefit or get help?
( you can add one more to the four giving to be discussed in the paper. not more than five)

* paragraphs should be half a page each.
* this paper must be CITED properly
*it must be QUOTED properly
*All sources used must be in the REFERENCE list
*introduction must be cited and must be a half a page
*conclusion should make a connection to the introduction (two paragraphs)
*retrieved pages
* CITATIONS ARE REQUIRED
Required Varieties

* At least one book
*One periodical
*One electronic source
*one reference book

THIS PAPER MUST BE WRITING IN PARAGRAPHS, OR SENTENCES. (NO LIST)

Note: An ABSTRACT is needed for this paper. ( not less than ONE paragraph) see sample below

Sample #1

Exposure to Community Violence in Adolescence

This research explores the relationship between exposure to violence and psychological stress among adolescents. It focuses on the cumulative experience of recurring community violence during the high school years, differentiates victimization from witnessing violence, and examines four conceptually separate psychological symptoms of trauma (anger, anxiety, depression, and dissociation). Exposure to recurring community violence is moderately correlated with the manifestation of psychological trauma symptoms. Further, being victimized and witnessing violence has independent (as well as overlapping) relationships with trauma symptoms. It is concluded that attempts to account for psychological stress among adolescents must include exposure to community violence.



Sample #2

Learner Development in Language Learning

The notion of learner-centered instruction in foreign and second languages grew out of the recognition that language learners are diverse, in their reasons for learning another language, their approach to learning, and their abilities. This research is about learner development, a learner-centered innovation in FL/SL instruction that responds to learner diversity by aiming to improve the language learneras ability to learn a language. First, an overview of concepts and practices that defined learner-centered language teaching is provided. Then, the foundational ideas that shaped early practice in learner development and the changes in the field that resulted as these ideas were implemented in language programs in various world regions are described. An evaluation of the theory and practice in learner development from the perspective of selected theories in SLA follows. The conclusion provides suggestions for future development.


HERE IS A SAMPLE OF A RESEARCH PAPER. FOLLOW IT ( YOU CAN PRINT IT)

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The York Scholar, v. 4 (Fall 2007)
THE RISE IN THE MORBIDITY AND THE MORTALITY
OF MALARIA IS A GLOBAL THREAT: EVIDENCE FROM
MULTIPLE ANTIMALARIAL DRUG RESISTANCE
Nestor Sapathy
Abstract
Antimalarial multidrug resistance is a major global public
health problem and the main reason for the erosion of efficacious
treatments. The spread of malaria globally has been attributed to
emergence of falciparum strains that are insusceptible to antimalarials,
which medical experts blamed on the development of
monotherapy (single-pill form). This research paper examines the
policies of the pharmaceutical industry that account for antimalarial
resistance. Further, it focuses on malaria as a threat to
global health, and the parasiteas increasing resistance to antimalarial
drugs. Strategies are also suggested for international collective
action for containment of drug resistance to malaria as
well as solutions to some of the problems that confront the pharmaceutical
industry.
This paper noted that the pharmaceutical companiesa
policies today promote early resistance to antimalarials, and thus
treatment failures. Combination therapy, a new approach to making
antimalarial drugs including artemisinin and other antimalarials,
is particularly effective in slowing development and the
spread of resistance, and reducing the death toll in the endemic
areas. This objective is achievable only if it gains adequate support
from international organizations such as the World Health
Organization (W.H.O.), political leaders around the globe and
other stakeholders.
59
The York Scholar, v. 4 (Fall 2007)
Malaria, an infectious disease, is a global threat and therefore
requires a global response and control. An estimated 350 a
500 million clinical cases of malaria occur worldwide, and greater
than 90% of them are reported in Africa (Center for Disease Control
and Preventive [CDC], 2004). Out of these, at least two million
deaths are recorded annually, mostly among children less
than 5 years and pregnant women. The rapid spread of the debilitating
disease around the world is mainly attributed to Plasmodium
falciparum strains that are now resistant to most of the antimalarial
drugs that have been developed. At the end of 2004, over
3.2 billion people lived in areas at risk of malaria transmission in
more than 107 countries and territories (CDC, 2004). Economists
believe that malaria is responsible for a growth penalty of up to
1.3% per year in some endemic countries, such as those in Africa
(CDC, 2004). With globalization booming, this disaster can lead
to a substantial difference in gross domestic product (GDP) between
nations with and without malaria and severely impede the
economic growth and productivity of the entire world.
Drug options for treatment of malaria are becoming increasingly
difficult and limited as a result of growing falciparum
strains becoming resistant to antimalarial drugs. This has become
a global problem. Globalization with concomitant international
travel increases the risk of countries importing diseases such as
malaria, an infectious disease that travels faster and further than
ever before. This stems from many factors, but currently health
experts blame pharmaceutical companies. The companiesa development
of antimalarial drugs in a single-pill form, instead of combination
therapy, results in early antimalarial drug resistance. The
proponents blame drug insusceptibility on the development of
substandard and counterfeit drugs by the pharmaceutical companies.
On the other hand, the critics attribute drug resistance to inappropriate
use or prescription of antimalarials by clinicians to
patients. Also, the inability of the medical technologists to identify
the species of the plasmodium in cross-infection in endemic
regions is a major problem. In addition, the availability of antmalarial
drugs from roadside stalls and hawkers who have little or no
60
The York Scholar, v. 4 (Fall 2007)
knowledge of dosage regimens, especially in poor countries
where drug regulation is weak, is also a cause of drug resistance.
The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance over the
past few decades globally has necessitated an increased monitoring
of pharmaceutical companies, and for which the W.H.O. has
taken the lead. The high morbidity and mortality rate worldwide
calls for a new policy to be implemented. Also, the pharmaceutical
industry is developing few new malarial drugs, so there is an
urgent need to take action to preserve the effectiveness of the
available drugs, for example, artemisinin. Furthermore, political
leaders and health policy makers in malaria-endemic regions especially
in Africa are alarmed over the de