Ow does the Court of Sessionas decision in Knight v Wedderburn reflect the ideas of philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment?

In Knight v Wedderburn (1778) 33 Mor Dict Dec 14,545, the Court of Session ruled that slavery was illegal in Scotland. A number of the judges who decided the case were also prominent intellectuals in the Scottish Enlightenment: Lord Kames (in the majority), Lord Auchinleck (in the majority; father of James Boswell, Dr Johnsonas biographer) and Lord Monboddo (who dissented). How does the Court of Sessionas decision in Knight v Wedderburn reflect the ideas of philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment?

You are required to present an entirely original discussion of the core concerns of the question, shows an extremely developed understanding of the relevant issues. Paper must show a thorough and relevant use of original sources, and other secondary sources and further Research Far exceeds the required number (12 sources plus all the specified original sources is the minimum) of appropriate original sources, and the research is directly related to the questions being asked. Requires effective written communication in a professional manner appropriate to the task to produce a clear and concise written work complying with the Australian Guide to Legal Citation (3rd edition).
Original sources:
1. Lord Kamesas Historical Law Tracts;
2. Adam Smithas Wealth of Nations
3. Adam Smithas Lectures on Jurisprudence;
4. Adam Smithas Theory of Moral Sentiments
5. You will also need to consult the arguments and the judgments in Knight v Wedderburn, which are accessible on the internet
Please include, inter alia, references also to these suggested sources:
1. Alexander Fraser Tytler, and John Vladimir Price (ed.), 1993. Memoirs of the Life and Writings of the Honourable Henry Home of Kames. vol. 2, p. 228, Routledge / Thoemmes Press
2. Home, Henry, and Peter Jones. 2005. Elements of criticism: the sixth edition. Natural law and enlightenment classics. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund.
3. Kames, Henry Home, and Mary Catherine Moran. 2007. Historical law: tracts. The natural law and Enlightenment classics series. Indianapolis, Ind: Liberty Fund
4. Kames, Henry Home. 1976. Essays on the principles of morality and natural religion. British philosophers and theologians of the 17th & 18th centuries. New York: Garland Pub.
5. Kames, Henry Home. 1993. Collected works of Henry Home, Lord Kames. London: Routledge/Thoemmes.
6. Lehmann, William Christian. 1971. Henry Home, Lord Kames, and the Scottish enlightenment: a study in national character and in the history of ideas. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.
7. McGuinness, Arthur E., Henry Home Kames, Henry Home Kames, and Henry Home Kames. 1970. Henry Home, Lord Kames. Twaynes English authors series, TEAS82. New York: Twayne Publishers.
8. Home, Henry, and Peter Jones. 2005. Elements of criticism: the sixth edition. Natural law and enlightenment classics. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund.
9. Ross, Ian Simpson. 1972. Lord Kames and the Scotland of his day. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
10. Somerset: Lord Mansfield and the Legitimacy of Slavery in the Anglo-American World
11. William M. Wiecek, The University of Chicago Law Review Vol. 42, No. 1 (Autumn, 1974), pp. 86-146 1599128
This is an essay in partial fulfilment of an Australian (QLD) Juris Doctor program, thus it must be at masters writing level for content, research and expression. Accurate referencing according to AGLC is essential. Note the requirement of referring directly to the specified original sources, as well as a minimum of 12 other secondary sources (solely scholarly materials and published sources, such as professional peer-reviewed journals) and the specific words of the judgements in the trial in question.
Maximum word count is 2100, but does not include footnotes.Please, feel free to contact me for further clarification.