Ritical Consciousness and the Development of Reflexivity

Critical Consciousness and the Development of Reflexivity Paper Introduction

To get started, here are the paper guidelines:

The paper is designed to critically reflect upon how personal, professional and political assumptions influence social work practice. Using either Faces of the Mind or the Ruthie Session videos (transcript is attached as a PDF for both of the resources listed above), you are asked to reflect upon the following:

1. What personal beliefs and values guide your understanding of peopleas problems or life challenges?

2. How do these beliefs and values influence your assessment of people and your ability to engage in relationship-building?

3. Discuss the influence of cultural assumptions in the work we do. How does cultural knowledge and understanding play a role in aspects of social work practice?

4. The final section of the paper considers the readings, class discussions, and media segments and how they have thus far affirmed, disconfirmed or transformed your understanding of social work practice and the role of the practitioner-activist.

(six pages, double-spaced maximum)

Choose at least 7 of the following resources from the following the list:


1. Fine, M. & Teram, E. (2009). Believers and skeptics: Where social workers situate themselves regarding the code of ethics. Ethics & Behavior, 19(1), 60-78.

2. Furman, R. (2009). Ethical consideration of evidence-based practice. Social Work, 54(1), 82-84.

3. Garvin, C. D. & Seabury, B. A. (2011). Foundations of interpersonal practice in social work: Promoting competence in generalist practice, 3rd Edition. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Chapter 2, pp. 17 38; Chapter 3, pp. 39 59.

4. Strom-Gottfried, K. (1999). Professional boundaries: An analysis of violations by social workers. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 80(5), 439a 449.

5. Cohen, B. (1999). Intervention and supervision in strengths-based social work practice. Families in Society, 80(5), 460-466.

6. Dean, R. G. (2001). The myth of cross-cultural competence. Families in Society, 82(6): 623-630.

7. Garvin, C. D. & Seabury, B. A. (2011). Foundations of interpersonal practice in social work: Promoting competence in generalist practice, 3rd Edition. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Chapter 4, pp. 60 98.

8. Saleebey, D. (2009). The Strengths Perspective, 5th Edition, Chapter 10.

9. Newberry, J. (2007). Reflexivity in practice: Reflections on an overseas practicum. Relational Child and Youth Care Practice, 20(2), 50-56.

10. Payson, H. (2007). Plowing: The art of facing an impossible task. Psychotherapy Networker, March/April, 95-96.

11. International Federation of Social Workers Definition of Social work: definition/en/print.html/

13. Blundo, R. (2001). Learning strengths-based practice: Challenging our personal and professional frames. Families in Society, 82(3), 296-304.

14. Gambrill, E. (1999). Evidence-based practice: An alternative to authority-based practice. Families in Society, 80(4), 341-350.

15. Garvin, C. D. & Seabury, B. A. (2011). Foundations of interpersonal practice in social work: Promoting competence and social justice, 3rd edition. Chapter 1, pp. 1-16.