Ritically analyse why a business can fail during the early stages of operation in a context you are familiar with

Subject: Entrepreneurs and Entrepreneurship


Higher marks will be obtained by:
showing that you understand the theories; applying theory correctly; providing evidence to back up your arguments; comparing and discussing different points of view; critical discussion a not just description, and definitely not just regurgitating lecture notes. Draw on previous empirical studies, theoretical papers, visiting speakers, case studies and your interview with an entrepreneur, wherever relevant.


Lancaster University Management School
Institute for Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Development

Assignments: some hints and tips



The following pages contain some general guidelines on coursework assignments. As conventions vary in different countries, the various sections are intended to provide some indications as to what we are looking for in coursework assignments. They also offer guidance on structure and approach.


1 WHAT MAKES A GOOD ASSIGNMENT?

A good assignment is one that addresses the question set, making use of a wide range of relevant literature and other sources to support a thoughtful discussion. It is clearly expressed and well organised, achieving a good balance between context, literatures, discussion, and synthesis of ideas, with convincing and well argued conclusions.

2 BEFORE YOU START

Analyse carefully the question you have been set, looking very closely at the precise wording. Donat just focus on one or two of the words in the question. If there is more than one part to the question, make sure that you have thought about the implications of each part. It will be important that you address each part in your answer.

Start your literature search early. If you find one good article, the work which that author or authors have drawn upon (as given in their references) is likely to lead you to other useful sources. So leave yourself time to follow that paper trail.

If you are photocopying an article or a section from a book, be careful to write on it at the time all the details which you will need for the reference. It can sometimes be very difficult sometimes to remember or track back later where you got something from.


3 OUTLINE ASSIGNMENT STRUCTURE

Generally speaking, an assignment will usually contain three distinct parts: a) an introduction, b) a main section containing discussion and analysis, and c) a conclusion.

Introduction

The introduction should literally introduce the reader to the assignment, by providing a context for what follows and defining the focus and approach being taken. Be clear in defining the focus and aims, ie what you are trying to achieve.

A good introduction should outline clearly the various areas which you are going to address, why, and in what order. This is where you are setting the parameters for what you are going to do. The introduction helps to make the structure and logical sequence of what follows more apparent to the reader. It can also be useful to you as you are put the assignment together a are you actually doing what you said you were going to do? Sometimes the assignment may evolve in a slightly different direction from what you had first planned: if that happens, you may want to revisit your introduction and rewrite it, so that it reflects what you have actually presented (so long as you are still addressing the question effectively, of course).

Main body of assignment

In the central part of the assignment you will be drawing on academic literature to help you build and develop your argument. You should be using appropriate theoretical frameworks, concepts or research findings and other source material to help you analyse the question set, consider and evaluate different perspectives, formulate arguments and demonstrate your understanding of the issues involved.

You need to bear in mind that the purpose of the coursework assignment is to demonstrate that you have developed thoughtful insights into the topic and issues covered in a particular course. A coursework assignment which does not draw on any of the material which you have been introduced to in the course fails to do this effectively. Such material includes lectures, tutorials, guest speakers, video cases, etc, as well as your own wider research. However, you are welcome and encouraged to refer to material from other courses where appropriate to develop your arguments. This can be a valuable way of showing the links between different disciplines.

While sub-headings might be frowned upon in a conventional essay format, for these assignments it is perfectly acceptable to use sub-headings; indeed, it can be a helpful way of organising your material and signalling the structure to your reader.

Conclusion

This is perhaps the most important section, and should be substantial and multi-dimensional not just a few lines. You need at this point to revisit the question, in order to reach some kind of overall a?verdicta on the question. Besides providing your considered verdict on the question the outcome of your thinking, research and analysis this is your chance to stand back and put the whole argument into a broad context.

Make sure that you do not introduce completely new arguments into your conclusions a this section should serve as a a?pulling togethera of the threads of your argument a it is not the point at which you introduce new material which needs fuller discussion earlier in the essay.

At Lancaster, we also encourage you to develop a habit of critical reflection; what does it all mean in the broader scheme of things? Does the a?theorya really help in interpreting and explaining what goes on? Finally, try to say a few words about yourself and the assignment process: what have you learned and how do you think the assignment could have been improved?

4 DEVELOPING YOUR DISCUSSION

Using academic literature

Reading as widely as possible in the literature should enrich your thinking and enable you to develop a more sophisticated and thoughtful level of discussion. The literature which is introduced in lectures is intended to be only a starting point for you. We expect you to go to the original sources wherever possible and to show evidence of reading beyond what is mentioned in lectures.

In any single area you are likely to find competing perspectives: sometimes the points of disagreement may be relatively slight and subtle, in other cases they will be more markedly divergent. A good assignment will review the literature as extensively as possible in relation to the question: it will compare and contrast the views of different authors, drawing out the key points of difference or agreement, considering why these may have arisen, and evaluating the merits of particular arguments. But focus on relevant theory only: theory that is relevant to your specific focus and to the arguments which you are discussing. Dont feel compelled to mention sources and frameworks for the sake of it this probably wont earn you any more marks!
We are interested here in your ideas, too a these are very important. However, you need to build a logical and convincing argument, and ensure that you do not make sweeping generalisations or unsubstantiated assertions. While that may be common and acceptable in opinion-based journalism, academic writing requires a more detached and reasoned approach. Any point you make needs to be supported wherever possible by evidence or argument from research or published studies. If you are expressing a more tentative hypothesis, for example maybe proposing an alternative perspective for which you do not have actual evidence, then it is wise to couch your language more cautiously. The use of words such as a?mighta, a?possiblya, a?perhapsa, etc, can be very useful.

All the sources you use should be clearly acknowledged. Use abbreviated references in the text e.g. Storey (1994) supported by a list of full references at the end of the assignment. We prefer that you use Harvard style referencing rather than footnotes (which can become cumb

Ritically analyse why a business can fail during the early stages of operation in a context you are familiar with.

ntroduction
Entrepreneurship was first coined as a term in the eighteenth century but it was not until the second half of this century that the term achieved widespread usage and became a focus of concentrated academic research. In the UK, the study of entrepreneurship has evolved in conjunction with a growing interest in the economic and social benefits of entrepreneurial activity. This is reflected in the central role given to entrepreneurs in the rhetoric surrounding the a?enterprise culturea, adapted by successive governments.

On the course we examine a variety of research findings that focus on the behaviours, motivations and business strategies of entrepreneurs, and we will consider how these issues may relate to the types and performance of ventures created. The second focus of the course is the a?entrepreneurial processa a the activities and issues involved in the creation of new ventures, their subsequent growth and eventual closure and failure. We will also examine entrepreneurial behaviour in a broader context than the small or growing business and assess the primary issues associated with entrepreneurial activity in family businesses, franchise systems, mature organisations and in not-for-profit contexts.

Frequent use will be made of illustrative case histories and several visiting speakers will share the reality of their entrepreneurial experience with the class.
Course Aims
To develop a degree of familiarity with current theory and research in entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial behaviour.
To gain an understanding of the processes of enterprise creation and development.
To understand the critical role of entrepreneurship in the facilitation of these processes.
To develop an understanding of the nature and problems of entrepreneurship in a number of contexts including the new business, the growing business, the franchise system, the larger corporation and non-profit and public sector organisations.
Write a 2,000 to 2,500 word essay on one of the topics below. You should aim to produce a well-integrated piece of work. The range of topics is intended to give you the choice of writing a a?theoreticala assignment or completing a project that involves some fieldwork.
Higher marks will be obtained by:
showing that you understand the theories; applying theory correctly; providing evidence to back up your arguments; comparing and discussing different points of view; critical discussion a not just description, and definitely not just regurgitating lecture notes. Draw on previous empirical studies, theoretical papers, visiting speakers, case studies and your interview with an entrepreneur, wherever relevant.
Essay Topics(Just choose 1 topic to write essay)
All answers should be illustrated with reference to theory, appropriate examples and guest speakers.

(1) How can an already existing business organisation change its culture to one which encourages more innovative and entrepreneurial behaviour?

(2) Why is franchising increasingly being used by franchisees as a form of business start-up?

(3) Critically analyse why a business can fail during the early stages of operation in a context you are familiar with.

(4) Critically evaluate the claim that a?a business is more likely to succeed if it is started by a team of good friendsa.
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Added on 24.11.2014 11:33
just choose 1 topics to write