Ritically Analyzing Professional Literature

Critically Analyzing Professional Literature
Responded to the questions in response to the article all must be addressed
1 .What errors are there in the reasoning behind the article?
2 .Is the author attempting to put forward a particular theoretical view of the world?
3. What kinds of evidence does the author muster in support of this view?
4. How adequate is the evidence?
What would you have liked to have seen in the article with respect to arguments or evidence that was not there?
Article: Annotation: The savant syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Vol 45(5), Jul, 2004. pp. 899-911.

Authors:
Heaton, Pamela, Psychology Department, Goldsmiths College, University of London, London, United Kingdom, P.Heatongold.ac.uk
Wallace, Gregory L., Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, London, United Kingdom
Address:
Heaton, Pamela, Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths College, University of London New Cross, London, United Kingdom, SE14 6NW, P.Heatongold.ac.uk
Source:
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Vol 45(5), Jul, 2004. pp. 899-911.
Page Count:
13
Publisher:
United Kingdom: Blackwell Publishing.
Other Publishers:
United Kingdom: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
ISSN:
1469-7610 (Electronic)
0021-9630 (Print)
Language:
English
Keywords:
savant syndrome, intellectual impairment, developmental disorder, autism, neuropsychology, savant skills
Abstract:
The following annotation briefly reviews relevant research and also attempts to address outstanding issues in this research area. Traditionally, savants have been denned as intellectually impaired individuals who nevertheless display exceptional skills within specific domains. However, within the extant literature, cases of savants with developmental and other clinical disorders, but with average intellectual functioning, are increasingly reported. We thus propose that focus should diverge away from IQ scores to encompass discrepancies between functional impairments and unexpected skills. It has long been observed that savant skills are more prevalent in individuals with autism than in those with other disorders. Therefore, in this annotation we seek to explore the parameters of the savant syndrome by considering these skills within the context of neuropsychological accounts of autism. A striking finding amongst those with savant skills, but without the diagnosis of autism, is the presence of cognitive features and behavioural traits associated with the disorder. We thus conclude that autism (or autistic traits) and savant skills are inextricably linked and we should therefore look to autism in our quest to solve the puzzle of the savant syndrome. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Subjects:
*Autism; *Cognitive Impairment; *Developmental Disabilities; *Neuropsychology; *Savants
Classification:
Developmental Disorders & Autism (3250)
Population:
Human (10)
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Document Type:
Journal Article
Release Date:
20040705
Digital Object Identifier:
10.1111/j.1469-7610.2004.t01-1-00284.x
PMID:
15225334
Accession Number:
2004-15269-001
Number of Citations in Source:
131
Database:
PsycINFO